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Tag: Department of Clinical and Social Sciences in Psychology

Early stress impacts cognition in low-income kids

Early stress impacts cognition in low-income kids

June 19, 2015

New research has now identified how specific patterns of cortisol activity may relate to the cognitive abilities of children in poverty. The study also outlines how greater instability in family environments, including harsh and insensitive caregiving in the context of poverty, may predict these different types of cortisol activity in children.

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Stress in low-income families can affect children’s learning

Stress in low-income families can affect children’s learning

June 18, 2015

Children living in low-income households who endure family instability and emotionally distant caregivers are at risk of having impaired cognitive abilities according to new research from Rochester’s Mt. Hope Family Center.

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Life stress negatively affects poor children’s cognitive development

Life stress negatively affects poor children’s cognitive development

June 17, 2015

Low-income children exposed to unstable family environments or insensitive caregiving at age of 2 are at increased risk of cognitive delays by age 4, a new study shows. “We found that children’s cortisol levels remained relatively stable across the three years,” said Jennifer H. Suor, a doctoral student in clinical psychology at the University of Rochester, in a press release.

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6 toxic people who may be sabotaging your happiness

6 toxic people who may be sabotaging your happiness

January 9, 2015

“These kind of relationships can be devastating,” Harry Reis, Ph.D., a social interaction researcher and professor of psychology at the University of Rochester, tells The Huffington Post. “There are just some relationships that can be harmful to our health. They put you in emotional — and sometimes physical — distress.”

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Seeing red

Seeing red

December 5, 2014

But the symbolism of the color red also permeates our lives in more subtle ways. In fact, research has shown that it may have the power to influence our psyches, desires, and behaviors. Conversely, though, red has also been linked to “avoidance motivation,” or a heightened desire to avoid failure. In a 2007 study, Andrew Elliot, a psychology professor at the University of Rochester, administered exams bound in different-colored packets.

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Zoologic: The Red Effect, in people and monkeys

Zoologic: The Red Effect, in people and monkeys

October 27, 2014

Benjamin Hayden of the University of Rochester and his colleagues wondered if this red effect reflects cultural influences or if there is a more ancient biological basis to it. In many human cultures, the color red is linked to sex and romance. But if the effect is found in other primates, it could reflect a biologically innate sensory bias.

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‘Red Effect’ sparks interest in female monkeys

‘Red Effect’ sparks interest in female monkeys

October 17, 2014

Recent studies have showed that the color red tends to increase our attraction toward others, feelings of jealousy, and even reaction times. Now, new research shows that female monkeys also respond to the color red, suggesting that biology, rather than our culture, may play the fundamental role in our “red” reactions.

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How the colour red warps the mind

How the colour red warps the mind

September 1, 2014

This first “study in scarlet” triggered a host of other experiments …. Soon, colour psychology was a credible scientific field in its own right. “That paper was really responsible for this resurgence in interest in colour and its possible effects,” says Andrew Elliot at the University of Rochester.

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The complex relationship between happiness and motivation

The complex relationship between happiness and motivation

August 18, 2014

Scientists Richard M. Ryan from the University of Rochester and Christina Frederick from the University of Southern Utah have taken an extensive look at the concept of subjective vitality as a reflection of well-being. Ryan and Frederick argue that subjective vitality is enhanced when the basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness are satisfied.

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Love people, not pleasure

Love people, not pleasure

July 18, 2014

In 2009, researchers from the University of Rochester conducted a study tracking the success of 147 recent graduates in reaching their stated goals after graduation. Some had “intrinsic” goals, such as deep, enduring relationships. Others had “extrinsic” goals, such as achieving reputation or fame.

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