Please consider downloading the latest version of Internet Explorer
to experience this site as intended.
Tools Search Main Menu

Tag: Department of Environmental Medicine

Benefits of breathing: Beijing’s Olympic babies born heavier, study finds

Benefits of breathing: Beijing’s Olympic babies born heavier, study finds

April 29, 2015

A study released in a scientific journal on Tuesday finds that women who were pregnant during the 2008 Beijing Olympics – when aggressive measures by the Chinese government over a seven-week period significantly reduced air pollution – gave birth to heavier and presumably healthier babies.

Continue Reading

Beijing Olympics study links pollution to lower birth weight

Beijing Olympics study links pollution to lower birth weight

April 28, 2015

Exposure to high levels of pollution can have a significant impact on fetal growth and development. Late pregnancy is a particularly important period of fetal growth, and the study suggests pollution may interfere with this period of development.

Continue Reading

E-cigarette vapours can damage lung cells

E-cigarette vapours can damage lung cells

February 9, 2015

A new study by University of Rochester suggests that e-cigarettes are likely to be a toxic replacement for tobacco products. Emissions from e-cigarette aerosols and flavourings damage lung cells by creating harmful free radicals and inflammation in lung tissue.

Continue Reading

TODAY: New study links e-cigarettes to lung cancer (video)

TODAY: New study links e-cigarettes to lung cancer (video)

February 7, 2015

Dr. Natalie Azar reports on recent findings by researchers at the University of Rochester that prove e-cigarettes are not as harmless as they seem.

Continue Reading

Decoding fat cells: Discovery may explain why we gain weight

Decoding fat cells: Discovery may explain why we gain weight

December 11, 2014

Medical Center researchers believe they’re on track to solve the mystery of weight gain – and it has nothing to do with holiday eggnog. They discovered that a protein, Thy1, has a fundamental role in controlling whether a primitive cell decides to become a fat cell, making Thy1 a possible therapeutic target in treating obesity.

Continue Reading