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Robbery and Assault

Before something happens, plan how you would react in different situations.

Follow these steps if you think you are being followed:

  1. Stay calm and look confident.
  2. Join a nearby group of people.
  3. Let the person know you know they are there. Look over your shoulder, but don't engage in conversation.
  4. Cross the street, vary your pace, or change direction. Stay in well-lit areas.
  5. Try to get to an open building and call Security at x13 or pick up any Blue Light Emergency Phone.
  6. Try to notice details, such as the suspect's clothing, eye and hair color; build, height, and weight; skin coloring; tattoos and scars.
  7. COOPERATE. If your wallet or book bag is forcibly taken, give it up rather than risk personal injury.
  8. Contact Security Services immediately. Use a Blue Light Emergency Phone, or dial x13 from any campus phone, or 275-3333 from a cell phone or off-campus phone.

If you have been raped or sexually assaulted:

  • Remain as calm as possible. If the attacker is not known to you, notice everything about that individual: clothes, hair, identifying marks, height and weight.
  • Ensure your safety. Call Security at x13 if you are on campus, or the local police at 911 if you are off campus. You can notify security and the police even if you do not wish to file an official report or pursue criminal proceedings. Specially selected University Security staff are available to work with you throughout the process.
  • Get medical care as soon as possible. Do not shower, bathe, douche, change your clothes, brush your teeth, or eat until after you have been examined for physical injury and have discussed your medical options.
  • Talk with someone about what happened. Talking to a friend, your R.A., or calling the Sexual Assault Hotline (275-7273), or one of the other resources listed in this publication can be helpful. Talking with someone does not commit you to filing a formal complaint, but may increase your understanding of the options available to you.
Last modified: Wednesday, 05-Jun-2013 15:49:35 EDT