Tag: Arts and Sciences

A healthy social life in your 20s may be a key to longevity

A healthy social life in your 20s may be a key to longevity

July 24, 2015

How busy your social life is at age 20 — and how solid the relationships are that you make when you’re 30 — are factors in your well-being later in life, according to research from the University of Rochester.

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College social life can predict well-being at midlife

College social life can predict well-being at midlife

July 23, 2015

A new 30-year longitudinal study shows that the quantity of social interactions a person has in their 20s—and the quality of the social relationships they have in their 30s—can benefit his or her well-being later in life. The study participants, now in their 50s, took part in the Rochester-Interaction Record (RIR) study as college students in the 1970s and again as 30-year-olds in the 1980s.

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Drawing a line between quantum and classical: Bell’s Inequality fails test as boundary

Drawing a line between quantum and classical: Bell’s Inequality fails test as boundary

July 21, 2015

The best guide to the boundary between our everyday world and the “spooky” features of the quantum world has been a theorem called Bell’s Inequality, but now a new paper shows that we understand the frontiers of that quantum world less well than scientists have thought.

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Babies’ expectations may help brain development

Babies’ expectations may help brain development

July 20, 2015

A series of studies with infants 5 to 7 months old has shown that the portion of babies’ brains responsible for visual processing responds not just to the presence of visual stimuli, but also to the mere expectation of visual stimuli.

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University on the Fringe

University on the Fringe

July 14, 2015

From September 17-26, students, faculty, staff, and alumni from across the University — including the After Hours student a capella ensemble above — will participate in the 2015 First Niagara Rochester Fringe Festival in downtown Rochester. Since its founding in 2009, the festival has doubled in size with more than 450 performances and more than 60,000 attendees.

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WATCH: The optical illusion that makes it so hard to hit a curveball

WATCH: The optical illusion that makes it so hard to hit a curveball

June 24, 2015

This video, which was put together by a group of University of Rochester researchers, demonstrates a phenomenon known as the “curveball illusion,” which basically tricks hitters into thinking a curveball is dropping quicker than it is.

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Watch: The optical illusion that makes it so hard to hit a curveball

Watch: The optical illusion that makes it so hard to hit a curveball

June 23, 2015

In baseball, the curveball is a monumentally difficult pitch to hit. It turns out there’s a very good scientific reason why. In a recent paper, a group of University of Rochester cognitive scientists conducted some tests to propose a new model of how the human brain uses motion to estimate the location of an object — and explain why it can sometimes be tricked.

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How understanding GPS can help you hit a curveball

How understanding GPS can help you hit a curveball

June 22, 2015

Our brains track moving objects by applying one of the algorithms your phone’s GPS uses, according to researchers at the University of Rochester. This same algorithm also explains why we are fooled by several motion-related optical illusions, including the sudden “break” of baseball’s well known “curveball illusion.”

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Family instability, stress tied to mental function for poor children

Family instability, stress tied to mental function for poor children

June 20, 2015

In a study of low-income children in the United States, those with more family instability and an emotionally unavailable mother early in life had higher levels of a stress hormone and more learning delays.

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Early stress impacts cognition in low-income kids

Early stress impacts cognition in low-income kids

June 19, 2015

New research has now identified how specific patterns of cortisol activity may relate to the cognitive abilities of children in poverty. The study also outlines how greater instability in family environments, including harsh and insensitive caregiving in the context of poverty, may predict these different types of cortisol activity in children.

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