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In the Headlines

SELECTED NEWS COVERAGE:
January 2009

Forbes (January 16)

Game, Not Gore, Keeps Video Players Playing

video game still image

It's the challenge of a video game, not the violence or gore it depicts, that keeps players playing, a new study says. Bloodiness, in fact, actually detracts from a game's "fun factor" for most players, according to the findings from the University of Rochester and Immersyve Inc., a firm that researches gamers' experiences. (Also Reported in: ABC News, Australian Daily Telegraph, BusinessWeek, Washington Post, MSNBC, Yahoo! Canada, Canada CBC News, WROC-TV, R News, UPI, The Daily Gleaner, Welland Tribune, Techradar.com, WHAM 1180 AM)

Discover Magazine (January 27)

Enough About Evolution and Scripture! Beyond the Science v. Religion Debate

Adam Frank is a professor of astrophysics at the University of Rochester who studies star formation and stellar death using supercomputers. His new book, The Constant Fire, Beyond the Science vs. Religion Debate, has just been published.

New York Times, (January 23)

F.D.A. Approves a Stem Cell Trial

"It's not ready for prime time, at least not in my mind, until we can be assured that the transplanted stem cells have completely lost the capacity for tumorogenicity," said Dr. Steven Goldman, chairman of neurology at the University of Rochester. He was a member of a committee convened by the F.D.A. last April to examine the safety aspects of trials using therapies from embryonic stem cells. (Also Reported in: Popular Science, Worcester Telegram)

UPI (January 26)

Red makes men feel more amorous with women

pictures of women in red

Two University of Rochester psychologists demonstrate that the color red makes men feel more amorous toward women — yet men are unaware of the role the color plays in their attraction. (Also Reported in: DNA India)

New York Times (January 23)

How Well Do You Know Your Children?

A study out of the University of Rochester last year screened the parents of more than 10,000 9-month-old babies, asking such questions as "Should a 1-year-old child be able to tell right from wrong?" and "Should a 1-year-old child be ready to begin toilet-training?" A third of parents got fewer than five of the 11 questions correct, meaning they had what researchers labeled a "low level knowledge of typical infant development."



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