fruit fly

When temperatures get cold, newly-discovered process helps fruit flies cope

Michael Welte and his team made their discovery while studying the internal mechanisms of the egg cell of the fruit fly, known as Drosophila. When temperatures drop, the rate at which certain proteins are built within egg cells slows down significantly more than the rate at which the raw materials are delivered. What keeps the assembly line functioning—based on the new research—is a protein called Klar.

July 21, 2014

In the Headlines

Opera News

And now for something completely different

While other vocal competitions just ask singers to sing, the Lenya Competition asks its contestants to create their own one-person musical narrative out of found materials and make us believe that it is all true.

On Saturday, April 12, from eleven o’clock in the morning until well after ten at night, the finals of the Lenya Competition, 2014 edition, ground through fourteen capaciously gifted young performers in the wood-paneled precincts of the Eastman School of Music’s Kilbourn Hall up in Rochester, New York.

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July 22, 2014
Bloomberg Businessweek

When virtual job interviews go horribly wrong

Enough companies now interview for jobs and internships over Skype (MSFT) that career offices have started to train business students in the art of conversing on video chat.

Karen Dowd, assistant dean of career management and corporate engagement at University of Rochester’s Simon Graduate School of Business, says one student during a virtual interview last year wore all the right things—but only above the belt.

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July 21, 2014
WHEC News 10

U of R scientists awarded $9 million to study immune system in action

A nine million dollar grant could help University of Rochester researchers find better ways to treat cancer and HIV.
The money from the National Institutes of Health will focus on immune system research. During the five year study, a team will examine images of immune system cells and see how they respond to inflammation and infection in mice.

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July 19, 2014

Science & Technology

fluorescing cells

NIH awards $9 million for study of immune system in action

The five-year grant funds work to adapt and develop cutting-edge imaging techniques. Researchers will make use of the University’s Multiphoton Core Facility, which contains state-of-the-art systems enabling in vivo (Latin for “in the living”) imaging and analysis.

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July 17, 2014
two photos of the same woman, one with her wearing a green shirt and one with her wearing a red shirt.

Women feel threatened by ‘the lady in red’

In a new study, psychology graduate student Adam Pazda found that women believe that other women who wear red are more sexually promiscuous and were less likely to introduce their husband or boyfriend to a woman wearing red.

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July 14, 2014
Rob Clark speaking at podium

Robert Clark stresses need for federal research support at National Press Club

Universities can help drive regional economic development and strengthen American competitiveness — but only if the federal government continues to partner with institutions and commits to provide the sustained research funding that is required to, first, discover a good idea, then “translate” it into products and services that benefit society.

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July 10, 2014

Society & Culture

Patriots pouring tea down a man's throat

Three things you didn’t know about the American Revolution

America typically celebrates the 4th of July as a unifying victory for the country, but the road to independence was more divisive and violent than most people realize, according to historian Thomas Slaughter.

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July 1, 2014
two people running across a beach with the flags of Sudan and South Sudan

Celebrating 59 Days of Independence

In their 59 Days of Independence project, artist and senior lecturer Heather Layton and Brian Bailey ‘09W (PhD) invite people around the world to celebrate the independence of countries other than their own. “By recognizing someone else’s independence, you’re showing that you care about his or her well-being in the same way you care about your own,” says Layton.

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June 23, 2014
numbers on leaves

When it comes to learning numbers, culture counts

The findings of a new study suggest that number learning is a fundamental process that follows a universal pathway. However, the timing of the process depends on a child’s environment.

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June 20, 2014

Photo of the Week

students in a backlit hallway, one of them looking into a telescope

Like summer camp … for subatomic particles

July 8, 2014

Optical engineering major Sarah Bjornland ’19 (left) uses a telescope to study resolution versus pupil size with local high school students Justin Shetty, Tyler Acton, and Dan Duguay. During Photon Camp, a week-long effort by the Institute of Optics to introduce more students to the growing field of optics, high school upperclassmen work with University undergrads to learn about the relevance of optics to everyday life.

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Student Life

students

Mock trial concludes Youth Legislative Session for Latino students

150 high school students from across the country are gathered in Rochester this week for the National Hispanic Institute’s Lorenzo de Zavala Youth Legislative Session (LDZ). Students will debate policies related to education, social inequality, and economics, among other topics.

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July 15, 2014

Six Rochester students headed abroad through research, language grants

This summer, six University of Rochester students will travel abroad through two nationally competitive scholarships, the Critical Language Scholarship and the DAAD-RISE Scholarship program. This year’s scholarship recipients will study at universities in Russia and Germany.

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June 25, 2014
Leah Swartz

Rochester student selected for prestigious Fulbright Summer Institute

Sophomore Leah Schwartz ’17 will spend six weeks this summer studying as a US-UK Fulbright Summer Institute participant. The program selects approximately 50 early college students from the United States and United Kingdom to participate in the summer academic and cultural exchange program.

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June 25, 2014

The Arts

Jonathan Binstock speaks from the podium

Jonathan Binstock named Memorial Art Gallery director

Binstock has worked as a curator at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia. He comes to Rochester from New York City, where he was a senior vice president and senior advisor in modern and contemporary art for Citi Private Bank’s Art Advisory & Finance group.

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July 7, 2014
Eastman Community Music School entrance

Young artists in concert: a celebration of winners

Several Eastman Community Music School (ECMS) students will be among six talented Young Artist Auditions award winners who will perform a free concert at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, July 6, in Eastman School of Music’s Kilbourn Hall.

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July 2, 2014
women playing piano, cello

Eastman students earn multiple awards, prizes

Eastman School of Music students and ensembles have garnered prestigious national honors and awards at several annual competitions.

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June 24, 2014

University News

Teen Health and Success Conference focuses on self-esteem, professional networking

More than 80 Rochester high school students will attend the two-day Teen Health and Success Conference on River Campus to focus on developing strategies for successful employment and crafting a statement about career aspirations and future goals.

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July 18, 2014
Beth Oliveres

Beth Olivares appointed dean for diversity initiatives in Arts, Sciences & Engineering

As dean, Olivares will serve as the senior strategist on student and faculty diversity, responsible for providing a vision and a strategy to help AS&E administration proactively create an inclusive environment.

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July 14, 2014
Joel Seligman at podium and smiling group around table

‘The end of the beginning’: A plan to save East High School

At the request of the Rochester City School Board, the University has submitted a plan intended to administer East High School, the largest high school in Rochester which is on the verge of being closed by the State because of inadequate performance.

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June 30, 2014