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David Barnstone's Latest Posts

New imaging technique helps predict how vision recovers after brain tumor removal

New imaging technique helps predict how vision recovers after brain tumor removal

December 10, 2014

An interdisciplinary team of University neuroscientists and neurosurgeons has used a new imaging technique to show how the human brain heals itself in just a few weeks following surgical removal of a brain tumor.

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Qiang Lin receives inaugural Leonard Mandel Faculty Fellow Award

Qiang Lin receives inaugural Leonard Mandel Faculty Fellow Award

December 5, 2014

Qiang Lin, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering and of optics, has been named the first Leonard Mandel Faculty Fellow. The award, which includes a two-year, $25,000 stipend, recognizes exceptional achievement by a junior faculty member in coherence and quantum optics.

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Sustainability, astrobiology combine to illuminate future of Earth’s technological civilization

Sustainability, astrobiology combine to illuminate future of Earth’s technological civilization

November 6, 2014

How long can a technological civilization last? Will human-caused climate change or species extinctions threaten its collapse or can industrial development continue without restrictions? In a new paper, two astrophysicists argue that these questions may soon be resolvable scientifically.

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‘Cloaking’ device uses ordinary lenses to hide objects across range of angles

‘Cloaking’ device uses ordinary lenses to hide objects across range of angles

September 25, 2014

Scientists have recently developed several ways—some simple and some involving new technologies—to hide objects from view. The latest effort, developed by physics professor John Howell and graduate student Joseph Choi, not only overcomes some limitations of previous devices, but uses inexpensive, readily available materials in a new way. “This is the first device that we know of that can do three-dimensional, continuously multidirectional cloaking,” said Choi.

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Lecture by world-renowned physicist brings quantum mechanics to the masses

Lecture by world-renowned physicist brings quantum mechanics to the masses

September 8, 2014

Anton Zeilinger, one of the world’s leading experts in the field of quantum optics, will present a free, public lecture Tuesday at the University of Rochester. The talk is designed to convey the exciting frontiers of quantum mechanics to a general audience.

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Researchers send electricity, light along same super-thin wire

Researchers send electricity, light along same super-thin wire

September 4, 2014

A new combination of materials can efficiently guide electricity and light along the same tiny wire, a finding that could be a step towards building computer chips capable of transporting digital information at the speed of light.

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Doing more with less: New technique efficiently finds quantum wave functions

Doing more with less: New technique efficiently finds quantum wave functions

August 28, 2014

University researchers have introduced a new method, called compressive direct measurement, that allowed the team to reconstruct a quantum state at 90 percent fidelity using only a quarter of the measurements required by previous methods.

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Duality principle is “safe and sound”: Researchers clear up apparent violation of quantum mechanics’ wave-particle duality

August 25, 2014

When scientists in Germany announced in 2012 an apparent violation of a fundamental law of quantum mechanics, The results were both “strange” and “incredible.” It took Robert Boyd and his colleagues nearly a year and a half to figure out what was going on.

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Mapping the optimal route between two quantum states

Mapping the optimal route between two quantum states

July 30, 2014

As a quantum state collapses, it will follow a path known as a quantum trajectory. In a new paper featured this week on the cover of Nature, scientists have shown that it is possible to track these quantum trajectories and compare them to a theory, recently developed by University of Rochester physicists, for predicting the most likely path a system will take.

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When temperatures drop, newly-discovered process helps fruit flies cope

When temperatures drop, newly-discovered process helps fruit flies cope

July 21, 2014

Rochester biologist Michael Welte and his team made their discovery while studying the internal mechanisms of the egg cell of the fruit fly, known as Drosophila. What keeps the assembly line functioning—based on the new research—is a protein called Klar.

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