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What is blue noise mask?

What is blue noise mask?

October 7, 2014

Two University engineers helped transform the early days of the digital revolution, setting off a “virtuous cycle” of research and invention that continues to be felt decades later. That’s the largely untold story of the blue noise mask.

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Researcher receives $1.25M grant to unlock ‘magic’ behind babies, language

Researcher receives $1.25M grant to unlock ‘magic’ behind babies, language

October 6, 2014

Elika Bergelson, a newly-appointed research assistant professor in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, focuses on understanding how babies learn words between 6-to 18-months old. Funding from the NIH recognizes Bergelson as one of the nation’s “exceptional early career scientist” and will help her pathbreaking work advance more quickly.

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Ebola Q&A: Rochester researchers share their views

Ebola Q&A: Rochester researchers share their views

October 3, 2014

Given the widespread attention regarding the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa, four Medical Center faculty with expertise in viral infections field questions about the outbreak, the nature of pandemics, vaccines, and what a U.S. outbreak might look like.

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Research seeks to break new ground in understanding of schizophrenia

Research seeks to break new ground in understanding of schizophrenia

October 2, 2014

More than $6 million in funding from the National Institute of Mental Health is supporting new research led by Rochester’s Center for Translational Neuromedicine that could fundamentally alter the way we comprehend and, perhaps ultimately, treat schizophrenia.

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Medical Center joins NIH network to fight arthritis, lupus

Medical Center joins NIH network to fight arthritis, lupus

September 25, 2014

The National Institutes of Health has invited the Medical Center to join the NIH Accelerating Medicines Partnership in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Lupus Network. Made up of 11 research groups from around the country, its aim is to develop new treatments for patients with the conditions.

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‘Cloaking’ device uses ordinary lenses to hide objects across range of angles

‘Cloaking’ device uses ordinary lenses to hide objects across range of angles

September 25, 2014

Scientists have recently developed several ways—some simple and some involving new technologies—to hide objects from view. The latest effort, developed by physics professor John Howell and graduate student Joseph Choi, not only overcomes some limitations of previous devices, but uses inexpensive, readily available materials in a new way. “This is the first device that we know of that can do three-dimensional, continuously multidirectional cloaking,” said Choi.

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Parasitic DNA stops “jumping” when protein takes charge

Parasitic DNA stops “jumping” when protein takes charge

September 23, 2014

Biology researchers Vera Gorbunova and Andrei Seluanov report that the “jumping genes” in mice become active as the mice age when a multi-function protein stops keeping them in check in order to take on another role. A protein called Sirt6 is needed to keep the jumping genes—technically known as retrotransposons—inactive.

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Cancer researcher awarded $18M to study cancer-related side effects

Cancer researcher awarded $18M to study cancer-related side effects

September 18, 2014

The National Cancer Institute grant, award to Principal Investigator Gary R. Morrow, funds a leadership role in a nationwide clinical research network to investigate cancer-related side effects.

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Communities considering fracking face long list of questions

Communities considering fracking face long list of questions

September 15, 2014

A new report examines the host of potential health-related issues that communities in areas of the country suitable for natural gas extraction may face and provides direction for future research.

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Less effective DNA repair process takes over as mice age, biologists find

Less effective DNA repair process takes over as mice age, biologists find

September 9, 2014

Biologists Vera Gorbunova and Andei Seluanov have discovered one reason for the the increase in DNA damage as we age: the primary repair process begins to fail and is replaced by one that is less accurate.

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