Tag: Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences

Monkeys also believe in winning streaks, study shows

Monkeys also believe in winning streaks, study shows

June 27, 2014

Humans have a well-documented tendency to see winning and losing streaks in situations that, in fact, are random. Now in the first study in non-human primates of this systematic error in decision making, researchers find that monkeys also share our unfounded belief in lucky streaks.

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When it comes to learning numbers, culture counts

When it comes to learning numbers, culture counts

June 20, 2014

The findings of a new study suggest that number learning is a fundamental process that follows a universal pathway. However, the timing of the process depends on a child’s environment.

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‘Seeing’ in the Dark

‘Seeing’ in the Dark

October 31, 2013

The eerie ability to see our hand in the dark suggests that the brain combines information from different senses to create perceptions.

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What’s Your Motion Quotient

What’s Your Motion Quotient

June 19, 2013

A surprisingly simple exercise measures the brain’s unconscious ability to filter out visual movement, and points to an unexpected link between IQ and motion filtering

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Autistic Kids Detect Motion Faster

Autistic Kids Detect Motion Faster

May 8, 2013

Such heightened sensory perception in autism may help explain why some people with the disorder are painfully sensitive to noise and bright lights.

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Making Sense of Monkey Math

Making Sense of Monkey Math

May 3, 2013

The study tracked eight olive baboons, ages 4 to 14, in 54 separate trials of guess-which-cup-has-the-most-treats.

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Your Brain on Big Bird

Your Brain on Big Bird

January 3, 2013

Using brain scans of children and adults watching Sesame Street, cognitive scientists are learning how children’s brains change as they develop intellectual abilities like reading and math.

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Brain’s Desire for Clarity Shapes Language

Brain’s Desire for Clarity Shapes Language

October 16, 2012 | 0 Comments

Many changes to language are simply the brain’s way of ensuring that communication is as precise and concise as possible.

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The Marshmallow Study Revisited

The Marshmallow Study Revisited

October 11, 2012 | 0 Comments

Children who experienced reliable interactions immediately before the marshmallow task waited on average four times longer—12 versus three minutes—than youngsters in similar but unreliable situations.

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