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Tag: Department of Physics and Astronomy

An alumnus in space

An alumnus in space

August 6, 2018

University of Rochester alumnus Josh Cassada ’00 (PhD) has been named one of nine NASA astronauts making up the first U.S. crew in history to journey to space in American-made, commercial spacecraft. Cassada would be the third Rochester alumnus to go to space, joining Jim Pawelczyk ’82 and Ed Gibson ’59.

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Much ado about nothing

Much ado about nothing

July 24, 2018

The concept of nothingness is the subject of everything from children’s books to philosophical debate. In the universe, however, is nothing ever possible? How have scientists, philosophers, and mathematicians thought about the concept of nothing throughout history and up to the present?

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Laser bursts generate electricity faster than any other method

Laser bursts generate electricity faster than any other method

June 20, 2018

A University researcher who predicted that laser pulses could generate ultrafast electrical currents in theory now believes he can explain exactly how and why actual experiments to create these currents have succeeded.

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Book shines a light on co-evolution of planets and civilizations

Book shines a light on co-evolution of planets and civilizations

June 12, 2018

In Light of the Stars, astrophysicist Adam Frank poses big questions about alien civilizations, climate change, and what life on other worlds tells us about our own fate.

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Alien apocalypse: Can any civilization make it through climate change?

Alien apocalypse: Can any civilization make it through climate change?

June 4, 2018

Does the universe contain planets with truly sustainable civilizations? Or does every civilization that may have arisen in the cosmos last only a few centuries before it falls to the climate change it triggers? Rochester astrophysicist Adam Frank and his collaborators have developed a mathematical model to illustrate how a technologically advanced population and its planet might develop together, putting climate change in a cosmic context.

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‘High-risk’ research receives University seed funding

‘High-risk’ research receives University seed funding

May 23, 2018

University Research Awards for 2018-19 have been awarded to 15 projects ranging from an analysis of the roles of prisons in the Rochester region, to a new approach to genome editing, to new initiatives for advanced materials for powerful lasers.

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Six Rochester students receive NSF Graduate Research Fellowships

Six Rochester students receive NSF Graduate Research Fellowships

April 27, 2018

Four undergraduates and two graduate students have been selected to receive National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowships, providing support for US students pursuing graduate degrees in STEM fields.

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We think we’re the first advanced earthlings—but how do we really know?

We think we’re the first advanced earthlings—but how do we really know?

April 16, 2018

Imagine if, many millions of years ago, dinosaurs drove cars through cities of mile-high buildings. A preposterous idea, right? In a compelling thought experiment, professor of physics and astronomy Adam Frank and director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Gavin Schmidt wonder how we would truly know if there were a past civilization so advanced that it left little or no trace of its impact on the planet.

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Professor assists NASA mission to measure disks that give birth to planets

Professor assists NASA mission to measure disks that give birth to planets

December 1, 2017

Unlike typical observatories that are positioned on the ground or in space, the telescope Dan Watson is working on is situated in between — on a Boeing 747SP jet airliner.

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In the mystery of positrons, dark matter is leading suspect

In the mystery of positrons, dark matter is leading suspect

November 16, 2017

Scientists at the HAWC Gamma Ray Observatory have ruled out two pulsars as the source of an unexpectedly large presence of positrons in our corner of the galaxy. Could they come from something more complex and exotic: dark matter?

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