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Tag: Joan Saab

Joan Saab named new vice provost of academic affairs

Joan Saab named new vice provost of academic affairs

February 5, 2018

In this newly created position in the Office of the Provost, Saab will strategize and coordinate key efforts that advance the University’s academic missions, as well as guide the accreditations, assessments and policies related to academic personnel and academic affairs.

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Life on the moon?

Life on the moon?

March 4, 2016

Joan Saab, associate professor of art history and visual and cultural studies, points to illustrations popularized in the 19th century press purporting to prove there was life on the moon, during the inaugural Hagop and Artemis Nazerian Humanities Lecture. “I’m interested in this moment in the 19th century when people are willing to suspend disbelief and see things—and even though they know they’re not true, to believe for that moment that they are.” (University photo / J. Adam Fenster)

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Taking a ‘look’ at historical hoaxes

Taking a ‘look’ at historical hoaxes

February 29, 2016

During the mid-19th century, a series of grand hoaxes captured the American imagination: the Great Moon Hoax, the Cardiff Giant, and the fantastical creatures of P. T. Barnum. Joan Saab, an associate professor of art history and visual and cultural studies, examines the relationship between seeing and believing.

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Don’t dump on the humanities, they help us think creatively

Don’t dump on the humanities, they help us think creatively

May 13, 2015

Today, it is hard to imagine that the national government would spend millions of dollars to put unemployed artists to work for the good of the country. But that is precisely what happened in the United States at the height of the Great Depression.

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Without a humanistic inquiry, we will lose our creativity

Without a humanistic inquiry, we will lose our creativity

May 11, 2015

Today it is hard to imagine that the national government would spend millions of dollars to put unemployed artists to work for the good of the country. But that is precisely what happened in the United States at the height of the Great Depression.

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