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Tag: Sharon Willis

Thinking about ‘visual privilege’ and the 2018 Oscars

Thinking about ‘visual privilege’ and the 2018 Oscars

March 1, 2018

Sharon Willis, a member of Rochester’s Film and Media Studies program faculty, says this year’s nominations show that change may be afoot in Hollywood—but that how much movies will be transformed remains to be seen.

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Scripted

Scripted

June 17, 2015

In her book, “The Poitier Effect: Racial Melodrama and Fantasies of Reconciliation,” Sharon Willis, a University of Rochester professor of Art and Art History/Visual and Cultural Studies, provides a comprehensive, deft analysis of respectability politics by using the films of Sidney Poitier — and their enduring effect on our depiction of racial reconciliation — as a case study.

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Book looks at civil rights through Poitier’s films

Book looks at civil rights through Poitier’s films

April 18, 2015

At a time when the civil rights struggles of the 1950s and 1960s changed the face of America, Sidney Poitier was probably the most visible black actor in the movie industry. In a new book, The Poitier Effect: The Melodrama and Fantasies of Reconciliation, University of Rochester professor Sharon Willis maintains that while Poitier’s films provide a lens for viewing the possibilities of improved race relations, this perspective doesn’t tell the whole story.

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<i>The Poitier Effect</i>: New book by film scholar examines ‘change without change’

The Poitier Effect: New book by film scholar examines ‘change without change’

April 6, 2015

Sir Sidney Poitier became a cultural icon in the 1950s as the first black actor to break racial barriers in film. But as art and art history professor Sharon Willis argues in her new book, his image on screen creates a false sense of equality that continues to appear in the popular media and remains damaging to race relations today.

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