University of Rochester

EVENT: "Aftermath of the 'Orange Revolution': Young People Will Protect Democracy," a lecture by Vyacheslav Bryukhovetskyy

TIME, DATE, AND PLACE: 3 p.m. Monday, April 25, in the Welles-Brown Room of Rush Rhees Library on the University of Rochester's River Campus

ADMISSION: Free and open to the public

April 8, 2005

A university president who led his students and staff into the streets when citizens of Ukraine realized that their presidential election was a fraud will discuss Ukraine's "Orange Revolution" and the country's future at 3 p.m. Monday, April 25, in the Welles-Brown Room of Rush Rhees Library at the University of Rochester. The event is free and open to the public.

Vyacheslav Bryukhovetskyy, president of the only private teaching institution in Ukraine, the National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, organized the Committee for National Salvation in November when the results of the presidential election were questioned by Ukrainians and outside observers. Weeks of nonviolent demonstrations followed, and the results of a second round of voting on Dec. 26 showed Viktor Yushchenko the winner.

Bryukhovetskyy's talk, titled "Aftermath of the 'Orange Revolution': Young People Will Protect Democracy," is co-sponsored by the Skalny Center for Polish and Central European Studies and the Department of Political Science at the University of Rochester, and the Rochester Ukrainian Group. He will speak on the University's River Campus.

Educated as a journalist in the 1970s, Bryukhovetskyy worked for a Ukrainian cultural newspaper before pursuing doctoral degrees in education and in the theory of literature. He is the author of more than 300 articles and publications since 1981.

He became president of the National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy in 1994, after being rector for three years. From 1980 to 1991, he was a researcher and head of the Department in the Institute of Literature at the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences. Bryukhovetskyy has held visiting professorships at Rutgers University in New Jersey and at the University of Manitoba in Canada.

For more information, contact the Skalny Center at (585) 275-9898.




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