University of Rochester

EVENT: "A Stone of Hope: Prophetic Religion, Liberalism, and the Death of Jim Crow," lecture by David Chappell of the University of Arkansas

TIME, DATE, AND PLACE: 5:30 p.m., Thursday, March 20, in the Gamble Room in Rush Rhees Library on the University of Rochester's River Campus

ADMISSION: Free and open to the public.

February 27, 2003

University of Rochester alumnus David Chappell will present the second Mary Young Lecture at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, March 20, in the Gamble Room in Rush Rhees Library on the University of Rochester's River Campus. His talk is titled "A Stone of Hope: Prophetic Religion, Liberalism, and the Death of Jim Crow."

Chappell, who received his doctorate in American history from the University in 1992, is currently associate professor of history at the University of Arkansas. He is the author of numerous articles and essays on civil rights issues in the United States, as well as the book Inside Agitators: White Southerners in the Civil Rights Movement. His second book, A Stone of Hope: Prophetic Religion, Liberalism, and the Death of Jim Crow, will be published this year.

After earning his bachelor's degree in history at Yale University in 1982, Chappell did research in London on the conversion of military industry to civilian purposes. He then worked as a research associate at the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington, D.C. He also was a research assistant for journalist Seymour Hersh and for Jesse Jackson's 1984 presidential campaign, for which he wrote the arms control position paper.

Chappell has been the recipient of grants from the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the John F. Kennedy Foundation, and the Lyndon B. Johnson Foundation.

The Mary Young Lecture Series is sponsored by the Department of History and recognizes the work of Professor Emerita Mary Young, a specialist in Native American history who joined the faculty as a full professor in 1973 after an 18-year tenure at Ohio State University.

Chappell also will discuss "The Debate Over Race and Rights Since the 1960s" at 1 p.m. on Friday, March 21, in the Gamble Room. For more information, contact the Department of History, (585) 275-2052.




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