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Tag: Benjamin Hayden

What ‘drives’ curiosity research?

What ‘drives’ curiosity research?

November 5, 2015

Scientists have been studying curiosity since the 19th century, but combining techniques from several fields now makes it possible for the first time to study it with full scientific rigor, according to the authors of a new paper.

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Curious monkeys trade ‘prize’ for information

Curious monkeys trade ‘prize’ for information

February 13, 2015

Monkeys have such robust curiosity that they are willing to give up a surprisingly large portion of a potential prize in order to quickly find out if they selected the winning option at a game of chance, new research has found.

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Curious monkeys share our thirst for knowledge

Curious monkeys share our thirst for knowledge

February 12, 2015

Monkeys are notoriously curious, and new research has quantified just how eager they are to gain new information, even if there are not immediate benefits.

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Gambling monkeys have hot hands just like humans

Gambling monkeys have hot hands just like humans

January 29, 2015

A new experiment from the University of Rochester has found that monkeys, like humans, suffer from “hot hand” syndrome in gambling scenarios. The study, which was not conducted at a treetop casino where tuxedo’d monkey bartenders sling daiquiris, focused on three primates interacting with a computer program, which they controlled by shifting their eyes to the left or right.

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Zoologic: The Red Effect, in people and monkeys

Zoologic: The Red Effect, in people and monkeys

October 27, 2014

Benjamin Hayden of the University of Rochester and his colleagues wondered if this red effect reflects cultural influences or if there is a more ancient biological basis to it. In many human cultures, the color red is linked to sex and romance. But if the effect is found in other primates, it could reflect a biologically innate sensory bias.

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‘Red Effect’ sparks interest in female monkeys

‘Red Effect’ sparks interest in female monkeys

October 17, 2014

Recent studies have showed that the color red tends to increase our attraction toward others, feelings of jealousy, and even reaction times. Now, new research shows that female monkeys also respond to the color red, suggesting that biology, rather than our culture, may play the fundamental role in our “red” reactions.

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