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Tag: Celeste Kidd

Did human-like intelligence evolve to care for helpless babies?

Did human-like intelligence evolve to care for helpless babies?

May 23, 2016

A self-reinforcing cycle of large brains, early birth, vulnerable infants, and intelligent parents is at the center of a novel model of human intelligence developed by brain and cognitive science researchers.

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Signs of intelligent life

Signs of intelligent life

February 17, 2016

Though few adults in the room can resist oohing and aww-ing, little Amelia is not there to be fawned over. She’s there to work. Researchers at the UR’s Baby Lab want to know what she’s thinking, what she’s learned so far in her young life, and how she learned it.

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What ‘drives’ curiosity research?

What ‘drives’ curiosity research?

November 5, 2015

Scientists have been studying curiosity since the 19th century, but combining techniques from several fields now makes it possible for the first time to study it with full scientific rigor, according to the authors of a new paper.

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14 Factors that affect the decisions you make

14 Factors that affect the decisions you make

October 2, 2015

But sometimes what looks like weak willpower could be quality decision making. In 2012, University of Rochester researcher Celeste Kidd published a study that challenged that marshmallow experiment.

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Connections: The Science Roundtable

Connections: The Science Roundtable

June 2, 2014

We take a look at the science of self-control and addiction with professors from the University of Rochester. On the roundtable today: Celeste Kidd and Benjamin Hadyen, assistant professors of brain and cognitive sciences; and Dr. Geoffrey Williams, professor of general medicine and associate professor of clinical/social psychology.

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The Marshmallow Study Revisited

The Marshmallow Study Revisited

October 11, 2012 | 0 Comments

Children who experienced reliable interactions immediately before the marshmallow task waited on average four times longer—12 versus three minutes—than youngsters in similar but unreliable situations.

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