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Tag: Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Tiny microenvironments hold clues to ocean nitrogen cycle

Tiny microenvironments hold clues to ocean nitrogen cycle

April 20, 2018

A new Rochester study shows that nitrogen-feeding organisms exist all over the deep ocean, and not just in large oxygen-depleted “dead zones,” changing the way we think about the delicate nitrogen cycle.

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What sound does ice make when it’s dropped 90 meters into an Antarctic glacier?

What sound does ice make when it’s dropped 90 meters into an Antarctic glacier?

March 6, 2018

Researchers in the University’s Ice Core Lab shared a viral video that shows the “unexpected and fascinating” noise that when it hits the bottom of a borehole in Antarctica.

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Earth’s magnetic field fluctuations explained by new data

Earth’s magnetic field fluctuations explained by new data

February 27, 2018

Using new data gathered from sites in southern Africa, researchers have extended their record of Earth’s magnetic field back thousands of years to the first millennium.

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Scientists discuss nuclear and climate threats to humankind

Scientists discuss nuclear and climate threats to humankind

February 8, 2018

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists recently moved the Doomsday Clock’s minute hand to two minutes to midnight, the closest it’s come to midnight since the Cold War. Tom Weber, professor of Earth and environmental sciences, discusses the clock and its underpinnings.

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Setback helped sharpen student’s focus on what matters most

Setback helped sharpen student’s focus on what matters most

January 25, 2018

Juliana Conley ’21 is using her experiences from a series of life detours to guide her academic goal: modeling wildfires and other environmental phenomena associated with climate change, via an interdisciplinary degree in geomechanics.

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Ocean waters prevent release of ancient methane

Ocean waters prevent release of ancient methane

January 17, 2018

Environmental scientist Katy Sparrow ’17 (PhD) set out to discover whether ancient-sourced methane, released due to warming ocean waters, survives to be emitted to the atmosphere.

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Time’s ticking as ‘Doomsday Clock’ scientists meet

Time’s ticking as ‘Doomsday Clock’ scientists meet

November 3, 2017

As the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists meets to evaluate scenarios for man-made catastrophe, Rochester scientists worry current risk levels are “way too high.”

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Dustin Trail wins award for studies of early Earth

Dustin Trail wins award for studies of early Earth

October 26, 2017

The assistant professor of earth and environmental sciences has been selected as the recipient of the 2017 Mineralogical Society of America Award, a major honor in the field.

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Icy air reveals human-made methane levels higher than previously believed

Icy air reveals human-made methane levels higher than previously believed

August 24, 2017

Professor Vasilii Petrenko and his team are studying the air trapped in ice cores that date back nearly 12,000 years, long before mankind’s use of fossil fuels, to separate man-made from naturally occurring methane sources.

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Creating communal spaces through public art

Creating communal spaces through public art

August 3, 2017

As part of the Take Five Scholars Program, Madison Carter ’18 is researching how public art—such as murals, sculptures, even performance art—influences social interactions in the city of Rochester.

This summer, the English literature and environmental studies major is interning with Richard Margolis, a well-known area photographer who documents art, architecture, and landmarks, and then compiles them into searchable databases. Carter is contributing to the descriptions of each piece of public art, researching the stories associated with their creation, and contacting the artists themselves for their input. She is also identifying additional works of public art to include in the database. (University photo / J. Adam Fenster)

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