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Tag: Giovanni Schifitto

Named positions celebrate the work of Rochester’s faculty

Named positions celebrate the work of Rochester’s faculty

February 8, 2021

The University’s Board of Trustees recently appointed eleven faculty members to named professorships in honor of their work as researchers, scholars, and teachers.

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Study will explore link between HIV, micro-strokes, dementia

Study will explore link between HIV, micro-strokes, dementia

October 2, 2017

New research will seek to understand why people who are HIV-positive are more susceptible to a progressive cerebrovascular disease that can ultimately give rise to dementia.

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URMC to study HIV and heart disease

URMC to study HIV and heart disease

January 9, 2015

A 50-year-old person living with HIV and being treated with anti-retroviral drugs may have the blood vessels of someone much older with the heart disease and stroke risk to prove it. “We’re trying to understand how that happens,” said Dr. Giovanni Schifitto, a University of Rochester Medical Center neurologist who is co-leading a $3.8 million study into premature vascular aging among HIV-positive individuals.

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New study probes link between HIV drugs, vascular disease

New study probes link between HIV drugs, vascular disease

January 5, 2015

A new $3.8 million grant will bring together clinical and bench researchers to better understand why individuals who receive anti-retroviral treatment for HIV are at greater risk for heart disease and stroke.

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URMC researchers win $3.8 million grant

URMC researchers win $3.8 million grant

January 5, 2015

University of Rochester Medical Center researchers have won a $3.8 million grant to study a possible link between treatments that keep AIDS in check and heart disease. Employing a method known as reverse translation, the URMC team will use ultrasound scanning technology developed by Marvin Doyley, UR associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, to track changes in human subjects carotid arteries.

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