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Tag: motivation

14 Factors that affect the decisions you make

14 Factors that affect the decisions you make

October 2, 2015

But sometimes what looks like weak willpower could be quality decision making. In 2012, University of Rochester researcher Celeste Kidd published a study that challenged that marshmallow experiment.

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Gambling monkeys have hot hands just like humans

Gambling monkeys have hot hands just like humans

January 29, 2015

A new experiment from the University of Rochester has found that monkeys, like humans, suffer from “hot hand” syndrome in gambling scenarios. The study, which was not conducted at a treetop casino where tuxedo’d monkey bartenders sling daiquiris, focused on three primates interacting with a computer program, which they controlled by shifting their eyes to the left or right.

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Why care about astronomy?

Why care about astronomy?

December 22, 2014

It’s true that astronomy has few practical applications and yet somehow its advances benefit millions of people across the world. Work itself is inherently valuable and it is somehow connected to our very existence. It stands alone and not as a path toward a paycheck or a practical application. Countless studies show just this.

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5th International Conference on Motivation Begins

5th International Conference on Motivation Begins

June 27, 2013

University of Rochester experimental psychologists Edward Deci and Richard Ryan will deliver the opening talks on Thursday.

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Reasons for Attending College Affect Academic Success

Reasons for Attending College Affect Academic Success

April 23, 2013

This was the first comprehensive study to examine these relationships using a large sample of college students across multiple institutions, controlling for various student demographic variables.

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The Marshmallow Study Revisited

The Marshmallow Study Revisited

October 11, 2012 | 0 Comments

Children who experienced reliable interactions immediately before the marshmallow task waited on average four times longer—12 versus three minutes—than youngsters in similar but unreliable situations.

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