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Tag: sex drive

Zoologic: The Red Effect, in people and monkeys

Zoologic: The Red Effect, in people and monkeys

October 27, 2014

Benjamin Hayden of the University of Rochester and his colleagues wondered if this red effect reflects cultural influences or if there is a more ancient biological basis to it. In many human cultures, the color red is linked to sex and romance. But if the effect is found in other primates, it could reflect a biologically innate sensory bias.

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How household plastics could ruin your sex life

How household plastics could ruin your sex life

October 21, 2014

Research into the effects of phthalates on women’s libido has yielded some strange headlines. The latest study, led by Dr Emily Barrett at the University of Rochester in New York State, was presented this week to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine’s annual conference in Honolulu.

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Rubber ducks can kill your sex drive, research finds

Rubber ducks can kill your sex drive, research finds

October 20, 2014

Women with the highest concentrations of “phthalates” in their bodies – chemicals used to make plastics bendy – were far more likely to suffer low libido, researchers found. “Phthalates are chemicals in plastics and basically they make plastic soft,” said Dr Emily Barrett, of the University of Rochester School of Medicine, in New York.

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Males may search for sex instead of food because their brains are programmed that way

Males may search for sex instead of food because their brains are programmed that way

October 20, 2014

There are some pretty basic building blocks to the survival of a species: that whole eating thing, and sex. Animals logically focus on both activities. But males prioritize the search for a mate over the hunt for grub, something that may be attributed to how their brains are programmed, according to new research published Thursday in the journal Current Biology.

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