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Welcome to the University’s official podcast.

Quadcast is the official podcast of the University of Rochester. Its content is conceived and created by members of the faculty, staff, and student body. The opinions and ideas expressed in the Quadcast, while likely entertaining and brilliant, do not necessarily reflect the opinions and ideas of the University.

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Polish Film Festival marks 20th year

Now in its 20th year, the Polish Film Festival is a fixture in Rochester, and for most of the last two decades, the job of choosing which films to feature has belonged to Bozenna Sobolewska, the administrative assistant of the Skalny Center for Polish and European Studies.

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East High: Education professor sees an environment in transition

Joanne Larson takes academic-scientific knowledge of best practices directly to East High’s classrooms, support staff, administrators, and teachers. She says the school feels “180 degrees different.”

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Ehsan Hoque, among ‘10 Scientists to Watch,’ is a study in resiliency

An expert in human-computer interaction and a pioneer in developing apps that help people hone their speaking and social skills, Hoque continues to apply lessons of resiliency he learned as an undergraduate.

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Jordan Smith and Rebecca Mooney

Student leaders take the reins

The University of Rochester’s first all-female Students’ Association leadership team sits down with host Peter Iglinski to talk about their plans for the 2017-17 academic year. Jordan Smith and Rebecca Mooney discuss their passions, their futures, and “shattering a glass ceiling.”

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patient getting an eye exam

Rebooting the brain for better vision after a stroke

Maybe you’ve recently suffered a stroke and are now starting therapy, trying to regain speech, motor functions, and possibly improve memory. But your vision is damaged, too, and there’s no therapy available.

Yet.

Krystel Huxlin, director of research and the James V. Aquavella Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of Rochester Medical Center’s Flaum Eye Institute, has been working in her lab over the last ten years to change that. Here’s how she sums up her latest results, published earlier this year in the journal Neurology:

“If people do exactly what we tell them and they don’t cheat, the success rate has been in our hands a 100 percent.”

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confused looking child

Does guilt make good parenting?

There isn’t much Judith Smetana doesn’t know about parenting teenagers. Not just because she has first-hand experience of a sudden eyebrow-pierced offspring, or a teenage son’s bedroom door sealed off with a not so-subtle message “police line—do not cross”—but rather because she’s made it her life’s work to study kids’ moral development and adolescent-parent relationships.

A professor of psychology at the University of Rochester, Smetana has become a regular go-to for national media such as the New York Times, Reuters, Time, and New York magazine. As a mentor and advisor to dozens of Rochester graduate students over an almost 40-year career, she has co-authored most recently a study with Wendy Rote, her former PhD student and now an assistant professor of psychology at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg. The study, published in the journal Developmental Psychology, looks at the effect of using guilt as a parenting tool.

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student carrying lots of stuff

A student’s guide for back to school

First-year students have plenty of questions about college life. Thankfully, the University of Rochester has answers. In this episode of the Quadcast, host Caitlin Davie ’19 asks University staff, recent graduates, and current students for their tips on making a smooth and successful transition to college life. One of the best takeaways? “You’re in the same boat as everybody else.”

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a student and her mom unpack the car

‘It’s time to let them fly’

Move-in day for the Class of 2021 is just around the corner. In this episode of the University’s Quadcast podcast, Nick Foti ’19 hears advice from parents, students and staff on facing that day when families drop their students off on campus for the first time.

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table with books and reports from the Gates Commission

Rochester, the draft, and an all-volunteer army

When President Richard Nixon ended the draft in 1973, he did so with the help of a roster of Rochester faculty and administrators. 100 years after the Selective Service Act established conscription, we look back on the University faculty and administrators who helped end it, and establish today’s all-volunteer military.

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image reads SOFIA SVECHINA, MOTHER OF THE CHURCH: A story of liberal Catholicism, religious conversion, nationalism, and the role of the European salon

Mother of the Church

Russian emigre and Catholic convert Sofia Svechina operated one of the most popular salons in early 19th century Paris. In her book Mother of the Church Tatyana Bakhmetyeva, a lecturer with the Susan B. Anthony Institute, describes how Svechina rose in influence as an adviser to numerous political, social, and religious leaders of her day.

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historic and modern photos of college graduation ceremony

Think you have the University’s commencement traditions down pat?

A university can acquire (and abandon) a lot of traditions over 150-plus years. “Tradition guru” University archivist Melissa Mead takes us on a little tour of some of our quirky graduation traditions—then and now.

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woman reaching up to grab a heart and ignoring a carrot, money, and star

What really motivates us

Is it money, power, and fame? Or rather fear and punishment? For nearly 40 years Richard Ryan and Edward Deci, the founders of self-determination theory, have sought to answer the question of human motivation.

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two sisters hugging

Graduating sisters overcome poverty, racism

Egyptian-born sisters Yasmin and Ayaa Elgoharry came to the U.S. aged seven and 11. Having nearly dropped out of high school, they are now each graduating with a master’s in educational leadership from the Warner School of Education.

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quad copter in the sky

Engineering skills meet ‘real world’ challenges

From drones that see color to devices that help veterinarians extract the objects our pets swallow, this year’s Design Day showcases 87 seniors projects from students in five engineering departments and computer science.

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students at table with a microphone

Take Five and a tuition-free fifth year

The Take Five Scholars Program is a University of Rochester original, offering an additional semester or year of study, tuition-free. As scholars Madison Carter ’18, Seneca Hutson ’18, and Tanveer Karim ’17 describe, the program is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to explore personal, academic, and professional passions outside their majors. Take Five advisor Juliet Sullivan is also a guest, and talks with host Jim Ver Steeg about some of the details of the program and how interested students can apply.

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drumset with YES logo

Prog rockers belong in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Friday’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony will welcome one of the most musically diverse class ever. John Covach, director of the University’s Institute of Popular Music, walks us through this year’s inductees and—with the help of his guitar—the Yes hit Roundabout.

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historic photo of soldiers on River Campus

Why did America enter World War I? Because Germany embarked on a deadly gamble.

One hundred years ago, on April 6, 1917, Congress voted to declare war on Germany, joining the bloody battle—then optimistically called the “Great War.” Rochester political scientist Hein Goemans explains why Germany was willing to risk American entry into the war.

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librarian looks at collection of letters on a table

Library acquires unknown Susan B. Anthony letters found in old barn

Forgotten for over a century, a recently discovered trove of more than a hundred letters fills in the political details of how the suffrage movement was run and the women activists who ran it.

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students at table with a microphone

‘When you have big data, you can get very lost’

Student host Nick Bruno ’17 talks with Warner School of Education professors Kara Finnigan and Karen DeAngelis about the opportunities and challenges data science presents to K-12 education researchers.

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students around a sound editing board

The sound behind the Grammys

With awards presented in 84 different categories, what does it mean today to produce award-worthy audio? Student host Nick Bruno ’17 checks in with Grammy Award-winner sound engineer Stephen Roessner, a lecturer in the University’s audio and music engineering program.

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poster for TV show Transparent

Transparent actor, producer, academics visit Rochester

Nora Rubel, director of the Susan B. Anthony Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies, discusses the upcoming symposium on Transparent which the institute — now in its 30th year — is hosting.

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jackolantern with MELIORA carved into it

What are the origins of Halloween?

Halloween is a staple in American culture, but what are the origins of the holiday? Emil Homerin, professor of religion, discusses Halloween’s roots in mysticism with student host Nick Bruno in this episode of QuadCast, the University’s official podcast.

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Monkees albums

The Monkees’ 50th anniversary: Interview with John Covach

John Covach talks with Nick Bruno in the studio about the Monkees, their influence on pop culture, and how their music ended up taking on a life of its own, in the premiere episode of UR Quad-Cast.

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