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Tag: Department of Physics and Astronomy

Quantum particles take the road most traveled

Quantum particles take the road most traveled

August 6, 2014

Physicists have developed a way to isolate the wacky quantum world and peer into it in a noninvasive way; this allows them to map the path that particles are most likely to take when changing from one state to another. “It’s a great breakthrough in terms of being able to monitor quantum systems,” Andrew Jordan, a physicist at the University of Rochester, who worked on the original theory, told Live Science. “We’re just scratching the surface of the kinds of physics permitted here.”

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Particle measurement sidesteps the Uncertainty Principle

Particle measurement sidesteps the Uncertainty Principle

August 6, 2014

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Particle measurement sidesteps uncertainty principle

Particle measurement sidesteps uncertainty principle

August 6, 2014

Quantum mechanics imposes a limit on what we can know about subatomic particles. If physicists measure a particle’s position, they cannot also measure its momentum, so the theory goes. But a new experiment has managed to circumvent this rule—the so-called uncertainty principle—by ascertaining just a little bit about a particle’s position, thus retaining the ability to measure its momentum, too.

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Mapping the optimal route between two quantum states

Mapping the optimal route between two quantum states

July 30, 2014

As a quantum state collapses, it will follow a path known as a quantum trajectory. In a new paper featured this week on the cover of Nature, scientists have shown that it is possible to track these quantum trajectories and compare them to a theory, recently developed by University of Rochester physicists, for predicting the most likely path a system will take.

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“Compressive sensing” provides new approach to measuring a quantum system

“Compressive sensing” provides new approach to measuring a quantum system

June 27, 2014

Physicists have shown that a technique called compressive sensing offers a way to measure both variables at the same time, without violating the Uncertainty Principle.

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Trapping light: a long lifetime in a very small place

Trapping light: a long lifetime in a very small place

June 16, 2014

Physicists have created a silicon nanocavity that allows light to be trapped 10 times longer than in other similarly-sized optical cavities. Nanocavities are key components of nanophotonics circuits.

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Experiment on earth demonstrates effect observed in space

Experiment on earth demonstrates effect observed in space

April 30, 2014

Streaming jets of high-speed matter produce some of the most stunning objects seen in space. an experiment by French and American researchers using extremely high-powered lasers offers experimental verification of one proposed mechanism for creating them.

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Riccardo Betti named inaugural Robert L. McCrory Professor

Riccardo Betti named inaugural Robert L. McCrory Professor

April 3, 2014

Riccardo Betti, professor of mechanical engineering and of physics and astronomy and assistant director for academic affairs at the Laborator for Laser Energetics, was named the inaugural Robert L. McCrory Professor.

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How stellar death can lead to twin celestial jets

How stellar death can lead to twin celestial jets

February 12, 2014

How do spherical stars evolve to produce highly aspherical planetary nebulae? A Rochester professor and his undergraduate student have a new theory as to why.

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Professor sings “I Have Failed My Physics Final”

Professor sings “I Have Failed My Physics Final”

January 21, 2014

Physics professor John Howell records a Les Miserables parody to motivate his Physics 121 students to attend workshops.

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