Tag: research finding

WATCH: The optical illusion that makes it so hard to hit a curveball

WATCH: The optical illusion that makes it so hard to hit a curveball

June 24, 2015

This video, which was put together by a group of University of Rochester researchers, demonstrates a phenomenon known as the “curveball illusion,” which basically tricks hitters into thinking a curveball is dropping quicker than it is.

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Watch: The optical illusion that makes it so hard to hit a curveball

Watch: The optical illusion that makes it so hard to hit a curveball

June 23, 2015

In baseball, the curveball is a monumentally difficult pitch to hit. It turns out there’s a very good scientific reason why. In a recent paper, a group of University of Rochester cognitive scientists conducted some tests to propose a new model of how the human brain uses motion to estimate the location of an object — and explain why it can sometimes be tricked.

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How understanding GPS can help you hit a curveball

How understanding GPS can help you hit a curveball

June 22, 2015

Our brains track moving objects by applying one of the algorithms your phone’s GPS uses, according to researchers at the University of Rochester. This same algorithm also explains why we are fooled by several motion-related optical illusions, including the sudden “break” of baseball’s well known “curveball illusion.”

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Family instability, stress tied to mental function for poor children

Family instability, stress tied to mental function for poor children

June 20, 2015

In a study of low-income children in the United States, those with more family instability and an emotionally unavailable mother early in life had higher levels of a stress hormone and more learning delays.

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Early stress impacts cognition in low-income kids

Early stress impacts cognition in low-income kids

June 19, 2015

New research has now identified how specific patterns of cortisol activity may relate to the cognitive abilities of children in poverty. The study also outlines how greater instability in family environments, including harsh and insensitive caregiving in the context of poverty, may predict these different types of cortisol activity in children.

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Stress in low-income families can affect children’s learning

Stress in low-income families can affect children’s learning

June 18, 2015

Children living in low-income households who endure family instability and emotionally distant caregivers are at risk of having impaired cognitive abilities according to new research from Rochester’s Mt. Hope Family Center. The study tracked the levels of the stress hormone, cortisol, in the children at ages 2, 3, and 4 and found that specific forms of family adversity are linked to both elevated and low levels of cortisol in children. Children with either the elevated or low cortisol levels had lower than average cognitive ability at age 4.

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Scripted

Scripted

June 17, 2015

In her book, “The Poitier Effect: Racial Melodrama and Fantasies of Reconciliation,” Sharon Willis, a University of Rochester professor of Art and Art History/Visual and Cultural Studies, provides a comprehensive, deft analysis of respectability politics by using the films of Sidney Poitier — and their enduring effect on our depiction of racial reconciliation — as a case study.

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Life stress negatively affects poor children’s cognitive development

Life stress negatively affects poor children’s cognitive development

June 17, 2015

Low-income children exposed to unstable family environments or insensitive caregiving at age of 2 are at increased risk of cognitive delays by age 4, a new study shows. “We found that children’s cortisol levels remained relatively stable across the three years,” said Jennifer H. Suor, a doctoral student in clinical psychology at the University of Rochester, in a press release.

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Banks monitor their borrowers, but who is monitoring them?

Banks monitor their borrowers, but who is monitoring them?

June 9, 2015

Research from Simon Business School professor Sudarshan Jayaraman delivers new evidence explaining how government safety nets that enhance banking protections influence bank monitoring and risk-taking behavior.

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Why stress can be good for you — no, really

Why stress can be good for you — no, really

June 2, 2015

You used to warn people stress increased the risk for heart disease, depression and made people sick. Why should we now embrace stress? …A researcher from the University of Rochester led a stress study in which half the participants had social anxiety disorder. Researchers found that within the first group, embracing anxiety was equally beneficial to those with the disorder and those without.

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