Tag: research finding

Close encounters of a tidal kind could lead to cracks on icy moons

Close encounters of a tidal kind could lead to cracks on icy moons

May 25, 2016

Until now, it was thought that the cracks on icy moons such as Pluto’s Charon were the result of geodynamical processes, such as plate tectonics. But new computer models run by Rochester researchers Alice Quillen and Cindy Ebinger suggest that the tidal pull exerted by another, similar object might have been the cause.

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Can’t resist temptation? That may not be a bad thing

Can’t resist temptation? That may not be a bad thing

May 24, 2016

A new study finds that what might have been described as “maladapted” behavior or a lack of self control may actually be beneficial and thoughtful behavior for children who have been raised in resource-poor environments.

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Did human-like intelligence evolve to care for helpless babies?

Did human-like intelligence evolve to care for helpless babies?

May 23, 2016

Because humans have relatively big brains, their infants must be born early in development while their heads are small enough to ensure a safe delivery. Early birth, though, means human infants are helpless for much longer than other primates, and such vulnerable infants require intelligent parents.

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After concussion, student athletes struggle in return to classroom

After concussion, student athletes struggle in return to classroom

May 20, 2016

Student-athletes who get a concussion often return to school within a week but still have significant problems in the classroom and cannot perform at a normal academic level, according to a new Medical Center study.

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A digital ‘Rochester Cloak’ to fit all sizes

A digital ‘Rochester Cloak’ to fit all sizes

May 19, 2016

Using the same mathematical framework as the Rochester Cloak, researchers have been able to use flat screen displays to extend the range of angles that can be hidden from view. Their method lays out how cloaks of arbitrary shapes, that work from multiple viewpoints, may be practically realized in the near future using commercially available digital devices.

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Conventional radiation therapy may not protect healthy brain cells

Conventional radiation therapy may not protect healthy brain cells

May 18, 2016

A new Medical Center study shows that repeated radiation therapy used to target tumors in the brain may not be as safe to healthy brain cells as previously assumed.

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Sensory processing weaker in patients with schizophrenia

Sensory processing weaker in patients with schizophrenia

May 10, 2016

“There is increasing evidence that there is something fundamentally wrong with the way these patients hear, the way they feel things through their sense of touch, and in the way in which they see the environment,” says Medical Center neuroscientist and study author John Foxe.

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Researchers demonstrate record optical nonlinearity

Researchers demonstrate record optical nonlinearity

April 28, 2016

A team led by Robert Boyd has demonstrated that the transparent, electrical conductor indium tin oxide can result in up to 100 times greater nonlinearity than other known materials, a potential ‘game changer’ for photonics applications.

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Subtle chemical changes in brain can alter sleep-wake cycle

Subtle chemical changes in brain can alter sleep-wake cycle

April 28, 2016

A new study by Maiken Nedergaard, co-director of the University’s Center for Translational Neuromedicine, reveals that our sleep-wake state appears to be dependent upon the concentration and balance of ions in the cerebral spinal fluid.

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Are we alone? Setting some limits to our uniqueness

Are we alone? Setting some limits to our uniqueness

April 27, 2016

Are humans unique and alone in the vast universe? This question– summed up in the famous Drake equation–has for a half-century been one of the most intractable and uncertain in science. But a new paper shows that the recent discoveries of exoplanets combined with a broader approach to the question makes it possible to assign a new empirically valid probability to whether any other advanced technological civilizations have ever existed.

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