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Kathleen McGarvey

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Kathleen McGarvey's Latest Posts

A ‘model of scholarly possibility’: Remembering Douglas Crimp

A ‘model of scholarly possibility’: Remembering Douglas Crimp

July 23, 2019

An internationally renowned art and cultural critic, theorist, curator, and activist, Rochester professor Douglas Crimp created work important to thinkers across the arts and humanities.

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Should we teach children patriotism in school?

Should we teach children patriotism in school?

June 24, 2019

In an interview with the Irish Times, University of Rochester philosopher Randall Curren discusses the role of “a proper, virtuous kind of patriotism.”

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‘The great democratic voice’

‘The great democratic voice’

May 30, 2019

May 31 is the 200th anniversary of poet Walt Whitman’s birth, and Rochester has a few ties of its own to the poet who contained multitudes.

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Open Letter novel is a Best Translated Book Award finalist

Open Letter novel is a Best Translated Book Award finalist

May 21, 2019

Fox, a novel by Croatian author Dubravka Ugrešić and translated into English by the University’s nonprofit literary translation press, is a finalist for the annual award honoring literature in translation.

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Where can philosophical thinking help? Everywhere.

Where can philosophical thinking help? Everywhere.

May 9, 2019

Philosopher Zeynep Soysal, who joined Rochester’s faculty this year as an assistant professor of philosophy, works at the place where mathematics and linguistics converge.

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Is ‘convincing’ the new ‘real’?

Is ‘convincing’ the new ‘real’?

May 1, 2019

As the University’s first artist-in-residence, Ash Arder brings her artist’s sensibility to explorations of conceptual systems, from computer science and the nature of virtual reality to ecology and environmental humanities.

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‘Filtering the patterns that matter to us’

‘Filtering the patterns that matter to us’

April 30, 2019

Epistemologist Jens Kipper has joined the University’s Department of Philosophy, bringing with him a focus on the nature of intelligence that spans the fields of philosophy, computer science, and artificial intelligence.

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How do you make a poem?

How do you make a poem?

April 9, 2019

Speakers of a language rely on its words to carry out even the most mundane acts of communication. But the same words are poets’ medium of creation. In his newest book, How Poems Get Made, James Longenbach asks how poets turn bare utterance into art.

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Has the Renaissance warped our view of the Middle Ages?

Has the Renaissance warped our view of the Middle Ages?

April 2, 2019

The picture of the Middle Ages as “awful, smelly, stinky, [and] dangerous” is not accurate, says medievalist and University of Pennsylvania professor David Wallace, this year’s Ferrari Humanities Symposia visiting scholar.

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A national pastime must have a national presence

A national pastime must have a national presence

March 28, 2019

As the baseball season opens, the league is looking to change some rules to speed up the game. English lecturer and baseball authority Curt Smith presents his own five-point plan to save the sport he loves.

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