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Sandra Knispel's Latest Posts

Stewart Weaver named Carnegie Fellow to support climate history study in Himalayas

Stewart Weaver named Carnegie Fellow to support climate history study in Himalayas

April 23, 2019

Professor of history Stewart Weaver has been named a 2019 Andrew Carnegie Fellow to continue work to preserve the rich culture and history of the Ladakh mountain region and its people.

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Rochester can become US growth engine, says MIT economist

Rochester can become US growth engine, says MIT economist

April 8, 2019

In his latest book, Jon Gruber puts Rochester at the top of the list of 102 cities poised to become next generation tech hubs. The MIT economist will host a panel discussion on Rochester’s potential to jump-start America.

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Why do new college students need alone time?

Why do new college students need alone time?

April 5, 2019

Spending time alone isn’t necessarily bad, especially for first-year college students. A new study shows that having a positive motivation for seeking solitude can be a predictor for successful adjustment to college life.

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Colleagues remember history professor emeritus Dean A. Miller

Colleagues remember history professor emeritus Dean A. Miller

April 3, 2019

Friends and colleagues are remembering Dean A. Miller, a professor emeritus of history with a secondary appointment in religion and classics, for his 30-year career at Rochester, and for his scholarship, character, and generosity.

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Susan B. Anthony Center calls for ‘extra 80’ to mark Equal Pay Day

Susan B. Anthony Center calls for ‘extra 80’ to mark Equal Pay Day

March 29, 2019

The University’s Susan B. Anthony Center has organized an initiative to mark Equal Pay Day, a national effort to promote pay equity for women of all backgrounds, and people of all races.

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Celebrating 60 years of ‘Seward’s Folly’

Celebrating 60 years of ‘Seward’s Folly’

March 28, 2019

The Alaskan flag, with its simple Big Dipper and North star design, was the winning entry submitted by a 13-year-old Aleut boy, John Bell Benson, for a competition by the Alaska Department of the American Legion. Chosen in 1927, this particular example is now part of the University’s William Henry Seward Papers.

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How to fail properly and often

How to fail properly and often

March 19, 2019

Julia Maddox, director of the University’s Barbara J. Burger iZone in Rush Rhees Library, talks about creating a safe space for students to try things, and fail, while reducing the pressure to have to succeed all the time.

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Applying psychology to online dating

Applying psychology to online dating

March 19, 2019

“There’s the old saying that you have to kiss a lot of frogs to find a prince—and I think that really applies to online dating,” says professor Harry Reis in an NBC News post on how to be better at online dating, according to psychology.

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Conservative audiences no less interested in <em>Captain Marvel</em>

Conservative audiences no less interested in Captain Marvel

March 18, 2019

“The myth that female- or minority-led films struggle at the box office has been debunked again,” writes Bethany Lacina, an associate professor of political science, in an analysis for the Washington Post.

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Watching for ‘bright lines’ during the Trump presidency

Watching for ‘bright lines’ during the Trump presidency

March 12, 2019

In a study spanning the first 18 months of the Donald Trump presidency, the non-partisan Bright Line Watch research group found large areas of agreement as to what constitutes critical democratic principles, but little agreement over which have been violated.

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