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Tag: Duje Tadin

Why can we see moving objects against their backgrounds?

Why can we see moving objects against their backgrounds?

July 2, 2019

New research from Rochester scientists explores why human beings are good at discerning moving objects and how we can train our brains to be better at this as we age.

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Brain stimulation speeds up visual learning in healthy adults, helps patients re-learn how to see

Brain stimulation speeds up visual learning in healthy adults, helps patients re-learn how to see

May 28, 2019

One particular type of brain stimulation enhances the brain’s ability to process visual information, and may aid in faster vision recovery after a stroke or traumatic brain injury.

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The science of seeing art and color

The science of seeing art and color

December 13, 2018

In each of more than 40 paintings of the same scene—London’s Waterloo Bridge—Impressionist artist Claude Monet manipulates viewer perception in a way that scientists at the time did not completely understand.

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Training brains—young and old, sick and healthy—with virtual reality

Training brains—young and old, sick and healthy—with virtual reality

February 13, 2018

Rochester researchers are using virtual reality-based brain training to better understand the brain’s plasticity in athletes who have experienced concussions and older adults with mild cognitive impairments. The goal? Improved therapeutic treatments patients can do at home.

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Brain training video games help improve kids vision

Brain training video games help improve kids vision

November 28, 2016

A new study by vision scientists finds that children with poor vision see vast and lasting improvement in their peripheral vision after only eight hours of playing kid-friendly video games.

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Your ear is a tape measure

Your ear is a tape measure

January 21, 2016

Most intervals between linked visual and auditory stimuli are so brief as to be imperceptible. A new study has found that we can glean distance information from these minimally discrepant arrival times nonetheless.

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Can humans hear distance?

Can humans hear distance?

November 4, 2015

A new paper says that our brains can detect and process sound delays that are too short to be noticed consciously. “Much of the world around us is audiovisual,” said Duje Tadin, associate professor of brain and cognitive sciences at the University of Rochester and senior author of the study.

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Our brains can help us hear, not just see, distance, researchers find

Our brains can help us hear, not just see, distance, researchers find

October 30, 2015

[Philip] Jaekl and colleagues at the University of Rochester in New York wanted to find out if our estimates might also be influenced by delays of sound so short we’re not conscious of them.

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Can we unconsciously ‘hear’ distance?

Can we unconsciously ‘hear’ distance?

October 28, 2015

Because sound travels much more slowly than light, we can often see distant events before we hear them. That is why we can count the seconds between a lightning flash and its accompanying thunder. Now researchers in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences have shown that our brains can also detect and process sound delays that are too short to be noticed consciously, and that we use that information to fine tune what our eyes see when estimating distance.

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WATCH: The optical illusion that makes it so hard to hit a curveball

WATCH: The optical illusion that makes it so hard to hit a curveball

June 24, 2015

This video, which was put together by a group of University of Rochester researchers, demonstrates a phenomenon known as the “curveball illusion,” which basically tricks hitters into thinking a curveball is dropping quicker than it is.

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