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Tag: Jiebo Luo

Goergen Institute for Data Science provides new opportunities for collaboration

Goergen Institute for Data Science provides new opportunities for collaboration

April 24, 2017

Launched in 2016, the institute serves as a hub, bringing together researchers in fields such as public health and political science, with experts in machine learning and data mining.

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Machine learning advances human-computer interaction

Machine learning advances human-computer interaction

March 10, 2017

Machine learning provides computers with the ability to learn from labeled examples and observations of data. Researchers at Rochester are developing computer programs incorporating machine learning to teach robots and software to understand natural language and body language, make predictions from social media, and model human cognition.

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Millions of tweets are a gold mine for data mining

Millions of tweets are a gold mine for data mining

February 21, 2017

Researchers can track the flu, consumer preferences, and movie box office sales, all from the millions of tweets posted every day.

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Twitter researchers offer clues for why Trump won

Twitter researchers offer clues for why Trump won

February 20, 2017

The more Donald Trump tweeted, the faster his following grew, even after he sparked controversies. This is among the many findings from an exhaustive 14-month study of each candidate’s tweets during the 2016 election by researchers Jiebo Luo and Yu Wang .

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Three health analytics projects receive pilot funding

Three health analytics projects receive pilot funding

August 25, 2016

The University’s Goergen Institute for Data Science has awarded grants to three projects aimed at using big data to improve treatment of patients who are in intensive care or who suffer from epilepsy or mental disorders.

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10 years later, ‘inconsequential’ tweets a boon for researchers

10 years later, ‘inconsequential’ tweets a boon for researchers

July 15, 2016

Twitter founder Jack Dorsey chose the name because “twitter” described “a short inconsequential burst of information.” And yet, the social network is anything but inconsequential in terms of data science research and its applications. Twitter, which went public on this date in 2006, is fertile ground for Rochester researchers interested in tracking everything from disease outbreaks to the dynamics of political campaigns and consumer preferences.

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Paying attention to words, not just images, leads to better captions

Paying attention to words, not just images, leads to better captions

March 15, 2016

A team of University and Adobe researchers is outperforming other approaches to creating computer-generated image captions in an international competition. The key to their winning approach? Thinking about words – what they mean and how they fit in a sentence structure – just as much as thinking about the image itself.

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Data mining Instagram feeds can point to teenage drinking patterns

Data mining Instagram feeds can point to teenage drinking patterns

October 29, 2015

By extracting information from Instagram images and hashtags, computer science researchers have shown they can expose patterns of underage drinking more cheaply and faster than conventional surveys.

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Instagram can help monitor teenage drinking patterns

Instagram can help monitor teenage drinking patterns

October 29, 2015

Instagram could help monitor drinking habits of teenagers more cheaply and faster than conventional surveys and also find new patterns, such as what alcohol brands are favoured by the youth, says a new study.

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Using social media to manage mental health

Using social media to manage mental health

February 6, 2015

Researchers at the University of Rochester are focusing on how social media messages can affect mental health. A new program using the camera on a smartphone or laptop can gauge stress levels for people as they use social media.

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