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Tag: Department of History

The US is fighting an unwinnable war in Afghanistan

The US is fighting an unwinnable war in Afghanistan

November 12, 2019

In a New York Times video op-ed, Lyle Jeremy Rubin, a history PhD candidate at the University of Rochester, and four other American veterans argue that the nation’s longest war is not winnable.

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Separating children from their families must be last resort

Separating children from their families must be last resort

October 28, 2019

In an essay published in the American Journal of Public Health, associate professor of history and practicing hospitalist Mical Raz writes that apart from extreme cases of imminent physical harm, “suboptimal families are better for children than removal.”

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Reel time: Richard Fischoff ’68 had big role in popular movies

Reel time: Richard Fischoff ’68 had big role in popular movies

October 25, 2019

Richard Fischoff ’68 didn’t star in Kramer vs. Kramer, Sleepless in Seattle, The Big Chill, or Fatal Attraction. But the veteran Hollywood producer and executive played a major role in those movies becoming box office hits.

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Native Americans, government authorities, and reproductive politics

Native Americans, government authorities, and reproductive politics

October 23, 2019

In her new book, assistant professor of history Brianna Theobald traces the long history of efforts by federal and local authorities to manage the reproductive lives of Native families, and the widespread activism that arose as a result.

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Calling Medicare ‘socialized medicine’ is a well-worn scare tactic

Calling Medicare ‘socialized medicine’ is a well-worn scare tactic

October 16, 2019

Conservatives have scared Americans into supporting higher health care costs, while shying away from expanding access, writes associate professor of history Michal Raz in a Washington Post op-ed.

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Why Biden’s record players won’t solve poverty

Why Biden’s record players won’t solve poverty

September 16, 2019

“Biden was voicing a deeply flawed theory that arose during the 1960s and that blamed parents, especially mothers, for the struggles of poor children and children of color,” writes associate professor of history Mical Raz in a Washington Post op-ed.

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For a union ‘better than it was’

For a union ‘better than it was’

September 13, 2019

He helped write the first anti-lynching law, and served as lead attorney for Homer Plessy, the defendant in the 1896 segregation case Plessy v. Ferguson. Long forgotten, Albion Tourgée, Class of 1862, is attracting renewed attention for his work for racial equality in the post-Civil War South.

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Has the World Health Organization measured up?

Has the World Health Organization measured up?

May 22, 2019

In a new history, Rochester professor emeritus Theodore Brown looks at how well the organization, founded in the aftermath of World War II, has met its lofty mission of ensuring “highest possible level of health” by all peoples.

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Stewart Weaver named Carnegie Fellow to support climate history study in Himalayas

Stewart Weaver named Carnegie Fellow to support climate history study in Himalayas

April 23, 2019

Professor of history Stewart Weaver has been named a 2019 Andrew Carnegie Fellow to continue work to preserve the rich culture and history of the Ladakh mountain region and its people.

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What historical artifacts like the ‘Lincoln bullet’ mean

What historical artifacts like the ‘Lincoln bullet’ mean

April 12, 2019

Associate Professor of History Larry Hudson, a specialist in 19th-century African-American history whose scholarly interests include the Civil War, answers questions about the significance and meaning of the bullet that killed President Abraham Lincoln.

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