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Tag: Department of Religion and Classics

QuadCast: What are the origins of Halloween?

QuadCast: What are the origins of Halloween?

October 28, 2016

Halloween is a staple in American culture, but what are the origins of the holiday? Emil Homerin, professor of religion, discusses Halloween’s roots in mysticism with student host Nick Bruno in this episode of QuadCast, the University’s official podcast.

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Sykes-Picot and the making of the modern Middle East

Sykes-Picot and the making of the modern Middle East

May 12, 2016

As the accord turns 100 years old, Aaron Hughes, professor of Jewish studies, weighs in on the impact the secret accord that established political control of territories in the Middle East among Great Britain, France, and Russia after World War I. / The Conversation

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Rochester’s prison education program aims to transform lives of inmates, undergraduates

Rochester’s prison education program aims to transform lives of inmates, undergraduates

May 10, 2016

Rochester will join forces with the Cornell Prison Education Program next year, as assistant professor of religion Joshua Dubler and his students bring the value of a higher education to an often invisible population while addressing the epidemic of mass incarceration.

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Joshua Dubler awarded Carnegie Fellowship to explore prison abolition

Joshua Dubler awarded Carnegie Fellowship to explore prison abolition

April 20, 2016

Joshua Dubler, assistant professor of religion, will spend the next two years pursuing the question of whether the prison itself is a necessary component of modern society.

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Scholars to discuss <i>‘Transparent’</i> at first academic conference

Scholars to discuss ‘Transparent’ at first academic conference

February 11, 2016

In December, the Susan B. Anthony Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies will host a conference examining the nexus of sex and gender studies, Jewish studies, American studies, and media studies themes that run through the show.

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Rochester professor awarded research fellowship to study impact of religion on mass incarceration

Rochester professor awarded research fellowship to study impact of religion on mass incarceration

February 27, 2015

Joshua Dubler’s project will shed new light on how changes in the religious landscape in America have contributed to tremendous growth in the prison system over the last 40 years.

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Internet spreads terrorist narrative but cultural understanding remains a powerful tool

Internet spreads terrorist narrative but cultural understanding remains a powerful tool

January 12, 2015

Since the shootings in Paris, many are wondering whether an attack on US soil will follow. According to experts, many complex cultural and societal factors shape the likelihood of similar events. Emil Homerin is a professor of Religion at the University of Rochester. He says that in the wake of the terrorist attacks in France, people should resist the urge to draw immediate parallels here.

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Eastman School and UR combining opera and comic books

Eastman School and UR combining opera and comic books

October 7, 2014

A series of events called “The Veils of Salomé,” at both the University of Rochester and Eastman School of Music, studies the intersections between religion, the arts, and gender over the centuries.

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Symposia, exhibit, opera look behind the veils of Salomé

Symposia, exhibit, opera look behind the veils of Salomé

September 23, 2014

The story of Salomé has been recreated in popular culture for more than 2,000 years. On Oct. 8-11, her evolving role in religion, society, and the arts will be explored in a two-day symposia and series of events titled The Veils of Salomé, at both the River Campus and the Eastman School of Music.

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The brutality of American punishment

The brutality of American punishment

July 7, 2014

By Joshua Dubler

For the reformers who dreamed it up back when our country was new, the penitentiary was to be an institution for quiet contemplation and personal repair.

Things didn’t turn out that way. The 2.4 million or so Americans currently in prison and jail are not there simply as punishment, but for punishment.

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