26 January 09 | Chad W. Post

I just got this along with a note that, “If you feel motivated to respond, please send your comments to both Francine Fialkoff at fialkoff@reedbusiness.com y Ron Shank at rshank@reedbusiness.com. There is always the possibility that they may reconsider their decision.”

Dearest friends and colleagues:

It is with much sadness that I inform you that Reed Business Information has decided to shut down publication of Críticas after eight long and successful years. Unfortunately, this means that my time with the company has come to an end.

The publisher stated that ad support has greatly diminished, and given the current economic downtown, there was no sufficient foundation on which to continue with the publication of Críticas. Still, they remain optimistic, adding that they hope to somehow continue coverage of the U.S. Spanish-language book market through sister publications Library Journal, Publishers Weekly, and School Library Journal. Your feedback to the editorial staff of those publications could help to move things in the right direction.

I take this opportunity to thank you all for your encouragement, trust, and support during my time here. I have acquired a wealth of knowledge and have made what I hope will be long-lasting relationships. I walk away with much satisfaction in my efforts and achievements here, as well as with wonderful friendships. I trust our paths will surely cross in the near future as we continue to help grow and solidify the U.S. Spanish-language book market.

My last day in the office is Friday, January 30.

Un fuerte abrazo,
Aída Bardales

P.S. In case I may have left someone off the distribution list, please do forward this message to our colleagues. Thank you.


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