2 February 09 | Chad W. Post

Otherwise I’d translate this article from Lyrtas about Ricardas Gavelis’s Vilnius Poker. (The one part I can pick out is the fantastic translation of my name: “Chadas W. Postas.” Very cool.)

Elizabeth Novickas—who has a great introduction to the novel that will appear in the next issue of CALQUE—was interviewed for this piece, the occasion of which is our publication of Vinius Poker, the first of Gavelis’s books to appear in English translation. (And one of only a handful of Lithuanian novels to come out in translation over the past few years.)

Gavelis was a bit of a controversial figure in Lithuania, both for his depictions of Vilnius and the racy content of his books. (And yes, there are some steamy scenes in Vilnius Poker in case you’re into that sort of thing.) Everyone seems to agree that V.P. is his masterpiece, a book that is considered to be “the turning point in Lithuanian literature.”

Although it was supposed to end this past Saturday, we’ll keep our special offer for V.P. up for a few more days. So instead of paying the $17.95 retail price (and yes, that is for a hardcover) you can buy it directly through our website for only $12.95.


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