29 November 10 | Chad W. Post

So, tomorrow morning at 9am East Coast time (which is 1400 GMT and 1500 Madrid time) we’re (meaning me, meaning Emily Davis, meaning staff from Granta) going to have a “Twitter Party” to discuss the “Best of Spanish-Language Novelists” issue, Spanish literature in general, translations, literary trends, etcetera.

I’ll be on there as open_letter, so feel free to me all your questions, jokes, comments about Duke basketball. As someone who tends to write long, I’ve yet to really get the hang of the Twitter. So, this should be riotous! Expect a lot of ellipses and multi-tweet responses . . .

Here are the official instructions (in English and Spanish) from the wonderful Saskia Vogel at Granta. (And all apologies about the unnecessary quotes below . . . Textpattern is freaking out about all the @ symbols and transforming chunks of this post into Comic Sans.):

On November 30, 2010 at 1400 (GMT) [0900, NYC; 1500 Madrid] Granta and Three Percent Blog (’@open_letter’) will host a discussion about literature in Spanish on Twitter. The discussion will end at 4pm (GMT) [1100, NYC; 1700 Madrid].

Participation is easy. Just follow these steps:

1. Sign in to your Twitter account.

2. Search for the hashtag #literatura

3. ‘@Grantamag’ will start making posts using this hash tag. For example: “The ‘@Grantamag’ and ‘@Open_Letter’ #TwitterParty about Spanish-langauge lit is starting in 5 minutes! #literatura”

4. ‘@GrantaMag’ will start the discussion with some questions and links. For example, “Will Vargas Llosa’s Nobel Prize encourage publishers to commission more translations? #literatura” or “Which new Spanish-language writers should we be reading #literatura”

5. Please join in and answer any questions or ask your own. Feel free to make statements on the subject, post links, etc. The discussion can be in Spanish or English.

REMEMBER: You must include #literatura in each of your posts to be part of the conversation.


El 30 de noviembre a las 1400 (GMT) [0900, NYC; 1500 Madrid], Granta y Three Percent Blog (’@open_letter’) presentará una discusión sobre la literatura en Twitter. Se acabará a las 1600 (GMT) [1100, NYC; 1700 Madrid].

Será fácil participar. Solo hay que:

1. Iniciar una sesión

2. Buscar el hashtag #literatura

3. ‘@GrantaMag’ empezará a enviar tweets incluyendo este hashtag, por ejemplo “The ‘@Grantamag’ and ‘@Open_Letter’ #TwitterParty about Spanish-langauge lit is starting in 5 minutes! #literatura”

4. ‘@GrantaMag’ iniciará la discusión con algunas preguntas y lienzos, por ejemplo, “Will Vargas Llosa’s Nobel Prize encourage publishers to commission more translations? #literatura” o “Which new Spanish-language writers should we be reading #literatura”

5. Siéntate libre a participar, responder a preguntas o formular otras. Exprésa tu opinion sobre el tema, envia lienzos etc. La discusión puede ser en inglés o español.

ACUÉRDATE: es esencial incluir el hashtag #literatura en cada de tus tweets para particpar en la conversación.

So tomorrow. Twitterverse. Be there.

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