16 December 11 | Chad W. Post

In this week’s podcast we take a break from that books thing to talk about the best music of 2011 according to me (Chad W. Post) and guest host Will Cleveland. Nathan Furl and Six (aka Elizabeth Mullins) also throw in their opinions about a ten artists, including Handsome Furs, WU LYF, M83, Battles, A.A. Bondy, Frank Ocean, Fucked Up, and others.

Click here to see Chad’s complete list (with commentary) and click here for Will Cleveland’s. Also, click here to listen to the special Spotify playlist we made with some of the songs from these albums.

This week’s intro/outro music was going to be R. Kelly’s “Trapped in a Closet” (this will make sense after you listen to the podcast . . . sort of), but instead, Nate made up a pretty rad mash-up of some of the songs we talk about.

If you enjoy this podcast, please pass this along to your podcast-listening friends and rate us on iTunes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions, feel free to email me at chad.post[at]rochester.edu.

As always you can subscribe to the podcast in iTunes by clicking here. To subscribe with other podcast downloading software, such as Google’s Listen, copy the following link.


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