28 September 12 | Chad W. Post

And now here’s the second half of Friday’s events. Remember, you can read the whole ALTA preview by clicking here.

Friday, October 5th

3:15 – 4:30 pm

Humor & Speculative Fiction

What are some of the challenges specific to translating humor in speculative fiction? Panelists will discuss examples from the works of Russian satirist Mikhail Bulgakov, French novelist Antoine Volodine, Haitian American short story author Ibi Zoboi, and French writer and illustrator Guillaume Bianco.

Sara Armengot: Moderator

Iván Salinas: “Irony and Alternate Worlds in the Post-Exotic Work of Antoine Volodine”

Edward Gauvin: “Billy Fog and the Pleasures of Doggerel”

Lori Nolasco: “The Loogaroo Laughed in Spite of Herself: Translating Ibi Zoboi’s Survival Epic The Fire in Your Sky into French and Spanish”

Lenka Pánková: “And the Canadians Didn’t Laugh: Culturally Conditioned Humor in Mikhail Bulgakov’s The Master and Margarita in Translation”

*

Problems & Approaches in Translating Contemporary Polish Poetry

This panel explores problems particular to translating contemporary Polish and American poetry into English and Polish respectively. Topics will include interrogating the relative ignorance of the Polish language among translators now working in the U.S. and the UK; and the reciprocal influence between modern and contemporary Polish and Anglo-American poetry from the Soviet era and the New York School. A range of perspectives will be offered on these topics. Two panelists are native speakers of Polish who work in the U.S.; two are Americans with some knowledge of Polish; and the fifth is a Polish poet and scholar of American and Polish poetry.

Marit MacArthur: “Why (or Why Not) Collaborative Translation?”

Piotr Gwiazda: “Why (or Why Not) Collaborative Translation?”

Kacper Bartczak: “The New York School in Poland: Pragmatic Matters of Influence”

Piotr Florczyk: “Reading Polish Poetry in America”

William Martin: “On the Use and Abuse of Polish Poetry for America”

And remember, you can download the entire schedule here.

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