26 October 12 | Chad W. Post

Next Tuesday we’re going to be hosting the second event of this year’s Reading the World Conversation Series—our annual event featuring four authors currently in residence at the Ledig House.

As one of—if not the—only residencies in the U.S. dedicated to international writing and literature, the Ledig House brings dozens of fantastic writers and translators to Omi, NY every year. It’s a gorgeous space, serving an excellent mission, and I’m really thankful that D.W. Gibson helps arrange this event every year so that we can help bring some extra attention to a few of the writers staying there.

Bios for the four authors involved in this year’s event can be found below, but just so I don’t bury the lede, here’s all the details about the event itself:

RTWCS: Ledig House Event
Tuesday, October 30th
6:00pm
Welles-Brown Room, Rush Rhees Library
University of Rochester

OK, and here are this year’s participants, each of whom will read a short bit of their work and then answer a few questions:

Saskya Jain
(India/Germany, Fiction/Translation)

Saskya was raised in New Delhi by a German mother and Indian father. Educated at Berlin’s Free University and Columbia University, she holds an MFA in Fiction from Boston University, where she was the recipient of the Florence Engel Randall Award for Fiction and the Robert Pinsky Global Fellowship for travel to Iran. Her writing has appeared in Literary Imagination, Hyphen Magazine and The Baffler. Saskya is currently at work on her first novel.

F.G. (Francisco) Haghenbeck
(Mexico, Fiction)

Francisco was born in Mexico City and has worked as an architect, museum designer, freelance editor, and TV producer. He currently works full time writing novels and editing historical and comic books. Two of his books are available in English: Bitter Drink (AmazonCrossing) and _The Secret Book of Frida Kahlo (Atria). He loves eating his wife’s gourmet food, drinking cocktails, reading the noir novels of Raymond Chandler and, watching cartoons with his daughter, Arantza.

Andrés Felipe Solano
(Colombia, Fiction)

Andrés has published the novel Sálvame, Joe Louis, and has worked as features editor for SoHo Magazine. In 2007, he lived in Medellin, Colombia, where he rented a room in a notoriously violent neighborhood and worked in a factory for six months. Based on this experience, he wrote Seis meses con el salario mínimo, finalist for the prize awarded by the FNPI, chaired by Gabriel García Márquez. In 2010 Granta included him in their list of The Best of Young Spanish-Language Novelists. He is working on his second novel, The Cuervo Brothers.

Amanda Curtin
(Australia, Fiction)

Amanda’s first novel, The Sinkings, was published by UWA Publishing in 2008, followed by a short fiction collection, Inherited, in 2011. She has been awarded residencies at the Tasmanian Writers Centre (Australia), Hawthornden Castle (Scotland) and the Tyrone Guthrie Centre (Ireland). Amanda is an Adjunct Lecturer at Edith Cowan University in Perth. At Writers Omi, she will be working on a novella project.

And for all you Facebook users, you can find this event here where you can invite all your friends, etc.

Hope to see you there on Tuesday!


Comments are disabled for this article.
....
Autobiography of a Corpse
Autobiography of a Corpse by Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky
Reviewed by Simon Collinson

One of the greatest services—or disservices, depending on your viewpoint—Bertrand Russell ever performed for popular philosophy was humanizing its biggest thinkers in his History. No longer were they Platonic ideals, the clean-shaven exemplars of the kind of homely truisms that. . .

Read More >

A Musical Hell
A Musical Hell by Alejandra Pizarnik
Reviewed by Vincent Francone

The best way to review Alejandra Pizarnik’s slim collection, A Musical Hell, published by New Directions as part of their Poetry Pamphlet series, is to begin by stating that it is poetry with a capital P: serious, dense, and, some. . .

Read More >

Astragal
Astragal by Albertine Sarrazin
Reviewed by Tiffany Nichols

Upon completing Albertine Sarrazin’s Astragal I was left to wonder why it ever fell from print. Aside from the location, Astragal could pass as the great American novel. Its edginess and rawness capture the angst and desires we all had. . .

Read More >

Live Bait
Live Bait by Fabio Genovesi
Reviewed by Megan Berkobien

When my eyes first crossed the back cover of Fabio Genovesi’s novel Live Bait, I was caught by a blurb nestled between accolades, a few words from a reviewer for La Repubblica stating that the novel was, however magically, “[b]eyond. . .

Read More >

The Skin
The Skin by Curzio Malaparte
Reviewed by Peter Biello

“I preferred the war to the plague,” writes Curzio Malaparte in his 1949 novel, The Skin. He speaks of World War II and the destruction it has wrought on Italy, the city of Naples in particular. But the plague he. . .

Read More >

Love Sonnets & Elegies
Love Sonnets & Elegies by Louise Labé
Reviewed by Brandy Harrison

With the steady rise of feminist scholarship and criticism in recent decades, it is little wonder that the work of Louise Labé should be attracting, as Richard Sieburth tells us in the Afterword to his translation, a “wide and thriving”. . .

Read More >

Conversations
Conversations by César Aira
Reviewed by Tiffany Nichols

In Conversations, we find ourselves again in the protagonist’s conscious and subconscious, which is mostly likely that of Mr. César Aira and consistent with prototypical Aira style. This style never fails because each time Aira is able to develop a. . .

Read More >

Nothing Ever Happens
Nothing Ever Happens by José Ovejero
Reviewed by Juan Carlos Postigo

You are not ashamed of what you do, but of what they see you do. Without realizing it, life can be an accumulation of secrets that permeates every last minute of our routine . . .

The narrative history of. . .

Read More >

The Pendragon Legend
The Pendragon Legend by Antal Szerb
Reviewed by P. T. Smith

Literature in translation often comes with a certain pedigree. In this little corner of the world, with so few books making it into this comforting nook, it is often those of the highest quality that cross through, and attention is. . .

Read More >

Mr. Gwyn
Mr. Gwyn by Alessandro Baricco
Reviewed by Paul Doyle

Alessandro Baricco’s Mr. Gwyn is a set of two loosely interlinked novellas that play with narrative and the construction of character. Ably translated by Ann Goldstein, Mr. Gwyn plays some subtle metafictional games as Baricco delves into what it means. . .

Read More >

The next few events from our Translation Events Calendar: See More Events >