26 October 12 | Chad W. Post

Next Tuesday we’re going to be hosting the second event of this year’s Reading the World Conversation Series—our annual event featuring four authors currently in residence at the Ledig House.

As one of—if not the—only residencies in the U.S. dedicated to international writing and literature, the Ledig House brings dozens of fantastic writers and translators to Omi, NY every year. It’s a gorgeous space, serving an excellent mission, and I’m really thankful that D.W. Gibson helps arrange this event every year so that we can help bring some extra attention to a few of the writers staying there.

Bios for the four authors involved in this year’s event can be found below, but just so I don’t bury the lede, here’s all the details about the event itself:

RTWCS: Ledig House Event
Tuesday, October 30th
6:00pm
Welles-Brown Room, Rush Rhees Library
University of Rochester

OK, and here are this year’s participants, each of whom will read a short bit of their work and then answer a few questions:

Saskya Jain
(India/Germany, Fiction/Translation)

Saskya was raised in New Delhi by a German mother and Indian father. Educated at Berlin’s Free University and Columbia University, she holds an MFA in Fiction from Boston University, where she was the recipient of the Florence Engel Randall Award for Fiction and the Robert Pinsky Global Fellowship for travel to Iran. Her writing has appeared in Literary Imagination, Hyphen Magazine and The Baffler. Saskya is currently at work on her first novel.

F.G. (Francisco) Haghenbeck
(Mexico, Fiction)

Francisco was born in Mexico City and has worked as an architect, museum designer, freelance editor, and TV producer. He currently works full time writing novels and editing historical and comic books. Two of his books are available in English: Bitter Drink (AmazonCrossing) and _The Secret Book of Frida Kahlo (Atria). He loves eating his wife’s gourmet food, drinking cocktails, reading the noir novels of Raymond Chandler and, watching cartoons with his daughter, Arantza.

Andrés Felipe Solano
(Colombia, Fiction)

Andrés has published the novel Sálvame, Joe Louis, and has worked as features editor for SoHo Magazine. In 2007, he lived in Medellin, Colombia, where he rented a room in a notoriously violent neighborhood and worked in a factory for six months. Based on this experience, he wrote Seis meses con el salario mínimo, finalist for the prize awarded by the FNPI, chaired by Gabriel García Márquez. In 2010 Granta included him in their list of The Best of Young Spanish-Language Novelists. He is working on his second novel, The Cuervo Brothers.

Amanda Curtin
(Australia, Fiction)

Amanda’s first novel, The Sinkings, was published by UWA Publishing in 2008, followed by a short fiction collection, Inherited, in 2011. She has been awarded residencies at the Tasmanian Writers Centre (Australia), Hawthornden Castle (Scotland) and the Tyrone Guthrie Centre (Ireland). Amanda is an Adjunct Lecturer at Edith Cowan University in Perth. At Writers Omi, she will be working on a novella project.

And for all you Facebook users, you can find this event here where you can invite all your friends, etc.

Hope to see you there on Tuesday!


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