10 December 12 | Chad W. Post

In this week’s podcast (Tom’s last one of of the year), we discuss the translations we did (and didn’t)1 read from 2012, including Maidenhair by Mikhail Shishkin, Satantango by Laszlo Krashnahorkai, Woes of the True Policeman by Roberto Bolano, and Necropolis by Santiago Gamboa. This kicks off the beginning of our “best of” podcasts for this year. Next week we’ll talk about music, and in the new year, Tom will be back to discuss the best movies of 2012.

As a preview for next week’s special music episode, we open this podcast with Porcelain Raft’s Drifting In and Out. A song that didn’t make my list . . .

As always you can subscribe to the podcast in iTunes by clicking here. To subscribe with other podcast downloading software, such as Google’s Listen, copy the following link.

1 Since I mentioned this a million times during the podcast, here’s the list of books I’m looking forward to reading over the next couple months:

Woes of a True Policeman, Roberto Bolano
Death Sentences, Kawamata Chiaki
Investigation, Philippe Claudel
Revenge, Yoko Ogawa
Encyclopedia of a Life in Russian, Jose Manuel Prieto
Ariadne in the Gortesque Labyrinth, Salvador Espriu
The Map and the Territory, Michel Houellebecq
Atlas, Kai-Cheung Dung
Black Flower, Young-ha Kim
LoveStar, Andri Snaer Magnason
Traveler of the Century, Andres Neuman
Mathematique:, Jacques Roubaud
Raised from the Ground, Jose Saramago
Tyrant Banderas, Ramon del Valle-Inclan
Down the Rabbit Hole, Juan Pablo Villalobos
Transit, Abdourahman Waberi
Museum of Abandoned Secrets, Oksana Zabuzhko
Blindly, Claudio Magris


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