26 July 13 | Chad W. Post

Wow. I’m just going to post this press release in its entirety:

The Polish Book Institute, the Polish Cultural Institute London, and the Polish Cultural Institute New York are delighted to announce that the winner of the 2012 Found in Translation Award is Antonia Lloyd-Jones. Usually the award is given for a single book, but this year the jury made an exception and decided to give the award to Ms Lloyd-Jones for the entirety of her output from the previous year.

Antonia Lloyd-Jones, who has been a particularly industrious translator of Polish prose and reportage, published no fewer than seven translations in 2012. “She has made an enormous impression with the quality of her translations on the one hand, and on the other with her versatility,” remarked Grzegorz Gauden, Director of the Polish Book Institute, “In only one year, she has published a collection of stories, and a novel, a biography, reportage, and a classic work of children’s literature.”

In acknowledgment of the quality of the translator’s work, several of these titles have been nominated for various literary prizes.

The complete list of translations by Antonia Lloyd-Jones published in 2012 includes:

Paweł Huelle Cold Sea Stories (Comma Press, 2012).
Jacek Dehnel Saturn (Dedalus Press, 2012).
Zygmunt Miłoszewski A Grain of Truth (Bitter Lemon Press, 2012).
Artur Domosławski Ryszard Kapuściński, A Life (Verso Books, 2012).
Wojciech Jagielski The Night Wanderers (Seven Stories & Old Street Publishing, 2012).
Andrzej Szczeklik Kore: On Sickness, the Sick and the Search for the Soul of Medicine (Counterpoint Press, 2012).
Janusz Korczak Kaytek the Wizard (Urim Publications/Penlight Press, 2012).

An award in the amount of 10,000 PLN, funded by W.A.B. Publishers, will be presented on November 15th at the London Review Bookshop, at a reading with the translator and author Jacek Dehnel. Antonia Lloyd-Jones is being honored for the second time, having received the award in 2008 for The Last Supper by Paweł Huelle.

The FOUND IN TRANSLATION AWARD is given annually to the translator of the best translation of Polish literature into English in the form of a book in the previous calendar year. The winner receives a cash prize, as mentioned above, a certificate, as well as a three-month residency in Kraków, funded by the Polish Book Institute.

There are established, talented translators who haven’t published seven books in their entire life, much less in one year. You go, Antonia! And seriously, she is extremely deserving of this award. Not just for her translations—which are all excellent—but what she does for Polish literature on the whole by talking it up, making connections with English presses, and mentoring younger translators.

Congrats, Antonia! Time for some Polish vodka, a pierogi, and a pączki!


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