6 March 14 | Kaija Straumanis

In a press release today, the French American Foundation and Florence Gould Foundation announced the finalists for their 27th annual translation prize for one work of fiction and one work of non-fiction.

According to the release, the foundations received 84 submissions to the Translation Prize, from over 40 publishers. This year, the list of finalists saw a massive increase in number. The 2012 list consisted of only three titles and translators—one in the fiction category, and two in the non-fiction category. In fact, with 10 titles in total, 2013 saw the highest number of winners in the history of the award. (The full list of past winners is here.) Hopefully, the foundations’ ability to award multiple translators will keep thriving, thus creating opportunities for a continued and healthy mix (and rotation) of well-known translators, and translators who are slowly working up their repertoire or are only just emerging.

From the release:

One Fiction and one Non-Fiction prize will be presented at the annual Awards Ceremony on May 22 in New York. Each winning translator will receive a $10,000 prize funded by the Florence Gould Foundation.

The jury, which includes Linda Asher, David Bellos, Linda Coverdale, Emmanuelle Ertel and Lorin Stein, has selected the best English translations of French works published in 2013. The 10 finalists form a prestigious and diverse group that includes books by award-winning authors and important French works available in English and in the United States for the first time.

Though every press would, obviously, love to see their title on the docket, this year’s list of translators and titles really is a good one, and even includes one of our newest author-friends, Jean-Marie Blas de Roblès, who was at the University of Rochester last fall to kick off our Reading the World Conversation Series, and is a fantastic person and amazing writer.

More info on the Translation Prize can be found at the French-American Foundation’s website.

The full list of fiction finalists is:

  • Edward Gauvin for his translation of The Conductor and Other Tales by Jean Ferry (Wakefield Press)
  • Adriana Hunter for her translation of Electrico W by Hervé Le Tellier (Other Press)
  • Mike Mitchell for his translation of Where Tigers Are at Home by Jean-Marie Blas de Roblès (Other Press)
  • Jordan Stump for his translation of All My Friends by Marie NDiaye (Two Lines Press)
  • Chris Turner for his translation of No Fixed Abode by Marc Augé (Seagull Books)

The list of non-fiction finalists can be seen here.


Comments are disabled for this article.
....
Anna Karenina
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
Reviewed by Christopher Iacono

For the past 140 years, Anna Karenina has been loved by millions of readers all over the world. It’s easy to see why: the novel’s two main plots revolve around characters who are just trying to find happiness through love.. . .

Read More >

The Cold Song
The Cold Song by Linn Ullmann
Reviewed by David Richardson

Linn Ullmann’s The Cold Song, her fifth novel, is built much like the house about which its story orbits: Mailund, a stately white mansion set in the Norwegian countryside a few hours drive from Oslo. The house, nestled into the. . .

Read More >

This Life
This Life by Karel Schoeman
Reviewed by P. T. Smith

Karel Schoeman’s Afrikaans novel, This Life, translated by Else Silke, falls into a genre maybe only noticed by the type of reader who tends toward Wittgenstein-type family resemblances. The essential resemblance is an elderly narrator, usually alone—or with one other. . .

Read More >

A Dilemma
A Dilemma by Joris-Karl Hyusmans
Reviewed by Christopher Iacono

In Joris-Karl Hyusmans’s most popular novel, À rebours (Against Nature or Against the Grain, depending on the which translated edition you’re reading), there is a famous scene where the protagonist, the decadent Jean des Esseintes, starts setting gemstones on the. . .

Read More >

Walker on Water
Walker on Water by Kristiina Ehin
Reviewed by P. T. Smith

There are books that can only wisely be recommended to specific types of readers, where it is easy to know who the respective book won’t appeal to, and Kristiina Ehin’s Walker on Water is one these. What makes this neither. . .

Read More >

The Nightwatches of Bonaventura
The Nightwatches of Bonaventura by Bonaventura
Reviewed by J. T. Mahany

Imagine the most baroque excesses of Goethe, Shakespeare, and Poe, blended together and poured into a single book: That is The Nightwatches of Bonaventura. Ophelia and Hamlet fall in love in a madhouse, suicidal young men deliver mournful and heartfelt. . .

Read More >

Pavane for a Dead Princess
Pavane for a Dead Princess by Park Min-Gyu
Reviewed by Christopher Iacono

In 1899, Maurice Ravel wrote “Pavane pour une infante défunte” (“Pavane for a Dead Princess”) for solo piano (a decade later, he published an orchestral version). The piece wasn’t written for a particular person; Ravel simply wanted to compose a. . .

Read More >

Tram 83
Tram 83 by Fiston Mwanza Mujila
Reviewed by Caitlin Thomas

Fiston Mwanza Mujila is an award-winning author, born in the Democratic Republic of Congo, who now, at 33, lives in Austria. From what I could find, much of his work is influenced by the Congo’s battle for independence and its. . .

Read More >

Twenty-One Days of a Neurasthenic
Twenty-One Days of a Neurasthenic by Octave Mirbeau
Reviewed by Lori Feathers

Twenty-One Days of a Neurasthenic is not a novel in the traditional sense. Rather, it is a collection of vignettes recorded by journalist Georges Vasseur in his diary during a month spent in the Pyrenées Mountains to treat his nervous. . .

Read More >

Sphinx
Sphinx by Anne Garréta
Reviewed by Monica Carter

Founded in 1960 by such creative pioneers as George Perec, Raymond Queneau and Italo Calvino, the Oulipo, shorthand for Ouvroir de littérature potentielle, came about in when a group of writers and mathematicians sought constraints to find new structures and. . .

Read More >