24 February 16 | Kaija Straumanis

Next Wednesday, March 2nd, at 6:30 pm, the amazing and local Rochester restaurant ButaPub will be hosting the first Reading the World Conversation Series (RTWCS) event for Spring 2016.

This first RTWCS of 2016 welcomes Swedish author Lina Wolff to discuss her new novel, Bret Easton Ellis and The Other Dogs, with Brian Wood, local author and fiction editor at POST magazine.

Here’s a bit more about Lina’s book, which came out from And Other Stories this January:

At a run-down brothel in Caudal, Spain, the prostitutes are collecting stray dogs. Each is named after a famous male writer: Dante, Chaucer, Bret Easton Ellis. When a john is cruel, the dogs are fed rotten meat. To the east, in Barcelona, an unflappable teenage girl is endeavouring to trace the peculiarities of her life back to one woman: Alba Cambó, writer of violent short stories, who left Caudal as a girl and never went back.

Mordantly funny, dryly sensual, written with a staggering lightness of touch, the debut novel in English by Swedish sensation Lina Wolff is a black and Bolaño-esque take on the limitations of love in a dog-eat-dog world.

You can also read an extract from the book here: http://www.wordswithoutborders.org/article/january-2016-bret-easton-ellis-and-other-dogs-lina-wolff-frank-perry.

Lina’s a true up-and-coming author, with two more titles coming out in English translation next year. Her work has appeared in Granta and she won the Vi Magazine Literature Prize, and was shortlisted for the Swedish Radio Award for Best Novel of the Year.

The event is free and open to the public, but you should definitely try out some of the menu items while you listen! We will have also have a limited number of copies of Lina’s book on-site for those who want to snag a signed copy!

See you there!


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