28 January 13 | Chad W. Post

Just a reminder for everyone out there that you have a few more days to submit to the 2013 PEN Literary Awards. From the email I just received:

Good news: there’s still time to submit to 2013 PEN awards before the deadline this Friday, February 1, 2013. If you haven’t already, submit today! Our awards program, the most comprehensive in the country, will present 17 awards in 2013. Send in your submissions or nominate a colleague to be considered for awards in the fields of fiction, science writing, essays, sports writing, biography, children’s literature, translation, drama, or poetry.

Visit here or write to awards@pen.org for more information.

BOOK SUBMISSIONS

FICTION AND NONFICTION

PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize ($25,000)
for an exceptionally talented fiction writer whose debut work—a novel or collection of short stories published in 2012—represents distinguished literary achievement and suggests great promise

PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay ($10,000)
for a book of essays published in 2012 that exemplifies the dignity and esteem of the essay form

PEN/E. O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award ($10,000)
for a book of literary nonfiction on the subject of the physical or biological sciences published in 2012

PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction ($10,000)
for a distinguished book of general nonfiction possessing notable literary merit and critical perspective published in 2011 or 2012

PEN/ESPN Award for Literary Sports Writing ($5,000)
for a nonfiction book on the subject of sports published in 2012

PEN/Jacqueline Bograd Weld Award ($5,000)
for a distinguished biography published in 2012

PEN Open Book Award ($5,000)
for an exceptional work of literature by a writer of color published in 2012

CHILDREN’S LITERATURE

PEN/Phyllis Naylor Working Writer Fellowship ($5,000)
for an author of children’s or young adult fiction, who has published at least two books to complete a book-length work-in-progress

PEN/Steven Kroll Award for Picture Book Writing ($5,000)
for an American or U.S.-based writer for exceptional writing in an illustrated children’s book published in 2012

TRANSLATION

PEN Award for Poetry in Translation ($3,000)
for a distinguished book of poetry in translation published in 2012

PEN Translation Prize ($3,000)
for a distinguished book-length prose translation published in 2012

PEN/Heim Translation Fund Grants ($2,000–$4,000)
to support the translation of book-length works that have not previously appeared in English

CAREER AWARDS

PEN/Laura Pels International Foundation for Theater Award for an American Playwright in Mid-Career ($7,500)
for a dramatist whose literary achievements are vividly apparent in the rich and striking language of his or her work (letters of nomination may come from anyone in the literary community)

PEN/ESPN Lifetime Achievement Award for Literary Sports Writing ($5,000)
for a writer whose body of work represents an exceptional contribution to the field (letters of nomination must come from PEN members)

PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry ($5,000)
for a poet whose distinguished and growing body of work represents a notable presence in American literature (letters of nomination must come from PEN members)

PEN/Nora Magid Award for Editing ($2,500)
for a magazine editor whose high literary standards and taste have contributed significantly to the excellence of the publication he or she edits (letters of nomination must come from PEN members)


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