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Peter Iglinski

Peter Iglinski is the press officer for science and public media. He covers biology, biomedical engineering, chemical engineering, chemistry, mathematics, and earth & environmental sciences.

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Peter Iglinski's Latest Posts

Fate of marine carbon confirms importance of polar oceans

Fate of marine carbon confirms importance of polar oceans

August 3, 2016

A new study shows that the polar seas are much better than other regions of the ocean at trapping carbon from marine plankton.

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Neidig recognized by Department of Energy

Neidig recognized by Department of Energy

June 24, 2016

Assistant professor of chemistry Michael Neidig is one of 49 scientists to be recognized this year by the Department of Energy as one of the nation’s “exceptional researchers” in his or her “crucial early career years.”

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Making the case for life on other planets

Making the case for life on other planets

June 15, 2016

How can we calculate the likelihood of technological civilizations having existed on other planets? That’s a question Adam Frank, professor of astronomy, considers in an essay, “Yes, There Have Been Aliens,” published in the New York Times.

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WeBWorK an award-winning way of learning from homework

WeBWorK an award-winning way of learning from homework

June 10, 2016

Twenty years ago, the idea of students doing homework online and receiving immediate feedback was a game-changer. Today, more than 700 colleges and high schools and using the WeBWorK system developed by Rochester math professors Arnold Pizer and Michael Gage.

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A digital ‘Rochester Cloak’ to fit all sizes

A digital ‘Rochester Cloak’ to fit all sizes

May 19, 2016

Using the same mathematical framework as the Rochester Cloak, researchers have been able to use flat screen displays to extend the range of angles that can be hidden from view. Their method lays out how cloaks of arbitrary shapes, that work from multiple viewpoints, may be practically realized in the near future using commercially available digital devices.

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Q&A: Poland’s evolving democracy

Q&A: Poland’s evolving democracy

April 13, 2016

Urszula Gacek, consul general of the Republic of Poland in New York, will discuss the transformation of local government in Poland and its integration of public-private partnership, participatory budgeting, and civil society.

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Q&A: The man who invented Dothraki

Q&A: The man who invented Dothraki

April 7, 2016

Linguist David Peterson, best known for creating the Dothraki and Valyrian languages for the HBO series Game of Thrones, will discuss the craft of creating new languages at a talk April 13.

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Q&A: New ways to make molecules

Q&A: New ways to make molecules

March 28, 2016

Daniel Weix specializes in developing better ways of creating molecules with the goal of speeding up the discovery of useful compounds, including pharmaceuticals.

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Q&A: Biologist earns raves for work with yeast

Q&A: Biologist earns raves for work with yeast

March 16, 2016

LISTEN: David Goldfarb, professor of biology, researches yeast as a model organism for understanding the aging process in humans. Why does this essential ingredient in bread and beer make a good research specimen?

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Body heat triggers shape change in new type of polymer

Body heat triggers shape change in new type of polymer

February 9, 2016

Polymers that visibly change shape when exposed to temperature changes are nothing new. But a research team led by Chemical Engineering Professor Mitch Anthamatten has created a material that undergoes a shape change that can be triggered by body heat alone, opening the door for new medical and other applications.

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