23 January 13 | Chad W. Post

I just found out that And Other Stories, arguable the hottest and most successful new publisher of the past few years, is looking to hire a NY-based part-time publicity director.

You can read the whole ad at that link (and it’s nothing like that other job listing from last month), but here’s the basics:

And Other Stories is an award-winning two-year-old publisher of literary writing based in the UK. We are now establishing a North American presence, largely in response to increasing interest in our titles in North America. We published Deborah Levy’s 2012 Man Booker Prize shortlisted Swimming Home (since bought by Bloomsbury USA) among other titles. We have a particularly strong list of Latin American titles, as our publisher Stefan Tobler is a translator from Portuguese (and German) while our editor Sophie Lewis works from Rio de Janeiro.

From September 2013 our new titles will be represented and distributed in North America by Consortium. We are recruiting a North American Director of Publicity to set up a home office for us in New York. The publicist will become a key part of the team. We want someone who reads widely and can speak with passion and pleasure about our books, and who is looking to stay with And Other Stories as we develop. And Other Stories has good experience of co-ordinating remote work, as our staff live in various locations. We offer an induction of two to three weeks in our main UK office at the start of the job (probably in April), so that the new person can work with the other team members and feel grounded in the role and connected to the team when back in New York. The publisher will also be in New York on occasion for face-to-face meetings.

Responsibilities

- developing a PR strategy

- galleys mail-outs and related pitching and follow-up on titles

- maintaining contacts databases for publicity

- writing and sending out press releases

- working with editor to find best use in the media for advance extracts, shorter pieces, introductions etc

- reporting on media coverage

- contributing to Facebook and other social media activity, incl our new blog Ampersand

- seeking friends and blurbs for specific authors or books where appropriate, and building relationships for And Other Stories in general

Send your CV and salary requirements to Stefan Tobler at info[at]andotherstories.org with ‘North American Publicity’ in the subject line by Friday 15th February 2013.


Comments are disabled for this article.
....
Kingdom Cons
Kingdom Cons by Yuri Herrera
Reviewed by Sarah Booker

Yuri Herrera is overwhelming in the way that he sucks readers into his worlds, transporting them to a borderland that is at once mythical in its construction and powerfully recognizable as a reflection of its modern-day counterpart. Kingdom Cons, originally. . .

Read More >

The Invented Part
The Invented Part by Rodrigo Fresán
Reviewed by Tiffany Nichols

Imagine reading a work that suddenly and very accurately calls out you, the reader, for not providing your full attention to the act of reading. Imagine how embarrassing it is when you, the reader, believe that you are engrossed in. . .

Read More >

A Simple Story: The Last Malambo
A Simple Story: The Last Malambo by Leila Guerriero
Reviewed by Emilee Brecht

Leila Guerriero’s A Simple Story: The Last Malambo chronicles the unique ferocity of a national dance competition in Argentina. The dance, called the malambo, pushes the physical and mental limits of male competitors striving to become champions of not only. . .

Read More >

The Little Buddhist Monk & The Proof
The Little Buddhist Monk & The Proof by Cesar Aira
Reviewed by Will Eells

Aira continues to surprise and delight in his latest release from New Directions, which collects two novellas: the first, The Little Buddhist Monk, a fairly recent work from 2005, and The Proof, an earlier work from 1989. There are a. . .

Read More >

Agnes
Agnes by Peter Stamm
Reviewed by Dorian Stuber

The narrator of Peter Stamm’s first novel, Agnes, originally published in 1998 and now available in the U.S. in an able translation by Michael Hofmann, is a young Swiss writer who has come to Chicago to research a book on. . .

Read More >

Class
Class by Francesco Pacifico
Reviewed by Vincent Francone

The thing about Class is that I don’t know what the hell to think about it, yet I can’t stop thinking about it. I’ll begin by dispensing with the usual info that one may want to know when considering adding. . .

Read More >

The Dispossessed
The Dispossessed by Szilárd Borbély
Reviewed by Jason Newport

To be, or not to be?

Hamlet’s enduring question is one that Szilárd Borbély, acclaimed Hungarian poet, verse-playwright, librettist, essayist, literary critic, short-story writer, and, finally, novelist, answered sadly in the negative, through his suicide in 2014, at the. . .

Read More >

A Greater Music
A Greater Music by Bae Suah
Reviewed by Pierce Alquist

A Greater Music is the first in a line of steady and much-anticipated releases by Bae Suah from key indie presses (this one published by Open Letter). Building off of the interest of 2016 Best Translated Book Award longlist nominee. . .

Read More >

Two Lost Souls: on "Revulsion" and "Cabo De Gata"
Two Lost Souls: on "Revulsion" and "Cabo De Gata" by Horacio Castellanos Moya; Eugen Ruge
Reviewed by Tim Lebeau

The dislocation of individuals from the countries of their birth has long been a common theme in contemporary literature. These two short novels recently translated into English appear firmly rooted in this tradition of ex-pat literature, but their authors eschew. . .

Read More >

Melancholy
Melancholy by László Földényi
Reviewed by Jason Newport

In Melancholy, Hungarian author, critic, and art theorist László Földényi presents a panorama of more than two thousand years of Western historical and cultural perspectives on the human condition known as melancholia. In nine chapters, Földényi contrasts the hero worship. . .

Read More >

The next few events from our Translation Events Calendar: See More Events >