14 February 13 | Chad W. Post

Just received this message from Erica Mena, one of the forces behind Anomalous Press, which is looking to take their virtual goods physical.

Anomalous Press is joining the physical world with a kick (start). [CWP Note: GROAN] We have six new books that are ready to be made flesh, well, paper.

Two of these books are very interesting, innovative works of translation. The first is a translation from the Latin of the 6th century poet/saint Venantius Fortunatus, collaged, manipulated and framed by poet and translator Mike Schorsch. The other is a highly literal ekphrastic translation of a Tintin comic done in French by poet Éric Suchére, and then translated from the French into English by poet and translator Sandra Doller. This book won the Anomalous Press Chapbook Contest for Innovative Translation selected by Christian Hawkey. There are excerpts of the books on the Kickstarter campaign page.

The full list of forthcoming books is below:

An Introduction to Venantius Fortunatus for Schoolchildren or Understanding the Medieval Concept World Through Metonymy by Mike Schorsch. Poetry/Translation (Latin).

The Continuing Adventures of Alice Spider by Janis Freegard. Poetry
Ghost by Sarah Tourjee. Fiction.

The Everyday Maths by Liat Berdugo. Poetry, winner of the Anomalous Press Chapbook Contest selected by Cole Swensen.

Mysteréiuse by Éric Suchére, translated by Sanrda Doller. Poetry/Translation (French), winner of the Anomalous Press Chapbook Contest selected by Christain Hawkey.

Smedley’s Secret Guide to World Literature by Jonathan Levy Wainwright IV, age 15 by Askold Melnyczuk. Fiction. [CWP Note: Although I’m not big on the cover, this is the one I’m most excited about.]

From now until February 26 you can pre-order copies and earn other rewards (handmade broadsides, books, and more) while helping us make our Kickstarter Campaign a success.

As per usual, there are different incentives for different donation levels, such as receiving 2 books, a postcard, and a shout-out online for contributing $25, or a lifetime subscription to the press AND a dinner date with an Anomalous editor for $1,000.

So, for you lonely Valentine’s Day folk, you should donate and get yourself some Anomalous date-times.

Or you could just give them some cash. They are really good people, doing really good work.


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