Spring 2023

Undergraduate Courses

ENT 223: Planning & Growing a Business Venture (4 credits) - Elizabeth Meyer

This course provides a dynamic, practical, hands-on approach that encourages students to immerse themselves in the vision, research, and planning aspects of a new venture. It is designed to teach students how to develop an idea, then to research, assess, and write detailed plans that can be used to create successful new ventures. Students will learn effective entrepreneurial practice that will make a difference in the ultimate success or failure of the entrepreneurial process.

ENT 227: Fundamentals of Social Entrepreneurship (4 credits) - Andras Miklos

This course deals with the social impact of business and entrepreneurship. We will use a blend of class discussions, case studies and lectures to explore the theory and practice of responsible business. Questions to be discussed include the following. What role can business play in meeting societal needs in improving health and education, protecting the environment or eradicating poverty? Do firms have a responsibility to help meet these needs? What are the limits of what can and should be done through business rather than through NGOs, development agencies or international institutions? How can we identify and measure the impact of business? We will look at these questions in the context of topics such as environmental sustainability, poverty and inequality, health promotion, lobbying, impact investing, advertising, fake news, nudging, machine learning and big data, and markets for organs. Offered every other year.

SOCI 210: Silicon Valley and Its Networks (4 credits) - Thomas Smith, David Silon

SOC210 is a dynamic and practical class open to all entrepreneurially-minded undergraduates. It examines the evolution of Silicon Valley and the foundations of Entrepreneurship and cultivates a deep understanding of Networks as a primary, organizing principle in social and entrepreneurial systems. SOC210 emphasizes student individuality, analytical thinking and intellectual synthesis while exploring contemporary and provocative topics in Entrepreneurship. Topics include: the Titans of Technology (Apple, Meta, Alphabet, et. al.) and corporate culture; the rise of AI and its social impact; human attachment and synchronization as the basis for entrepreneurial networks and product cycles; the Metaverse, AR/VR, and fabricated realities; Competition, Customers, Complexity and Catastrophes!; and Economics, Markets, and Crypto/Blockchains. Students will hear from guest speakers and build confidence through active participation in class exercises, especially individual/group projects and presentations. SOC210 provides students with a broad entrepreneurial skillset and tactical job market preparation.

NOTE: SOC210 is a core class for students enrolled in UR’s e5 program. SOC212 is a related class and may be taken concurrently.

SOCI 212: Silicon Valley Sandbox (2 credits) - Thomas Smith, David Silon

Do you want to be a better entrepreneur and learn how to think on your feet? Are you looking for a novel and interactive academic experience? Come play in our Silicon Valley Sandbox! SOC212 is a stand-alone class open to all students and focuses on practicing real-world entrepreneurial skills. Students will engage in fun and challenging exercises including business role-playing, pitch games, improv, networking, and various types of mock interviews and meetings. The class will also offer a forum for students to prepare for upcoming entrepreneurial competitions and practice pitching to an audience of their peers and professorial coaches. Be the fish or the shark! Bring your creativity, individuality and motivation and leave with newfound entrepreneurial skill and confidence!

NOTE: SOC212 is a core class for students enrolled in UR’s e5 program. SOC210 is a related class and may be taken concurrently.

DMST 104: Design in the Digital Age (4 credits) - Kristana Textor

Designing digital products and services requires a process of Interaction Design which is a wholly new discipline that moves beyond previous fads of simply making digital things that look like physical world objects. Since there is no known formula for creating great UI/UX we will explore the need to consider interactivity as a design process, moving from initial ethnographic research through ideation and design, and the many steps that lead to final delivery and presentation. Mastery of this process will prepare DMS students to undertake their senior capstone project as well as effectively develop other creative and entrepreneurial ideas/ventures.

PSCI 244K: Politics & Markets: Innovation and the Global Business Environment (4 credits) - David Primo

Innovation is a driving force behind the massive increases in wealth that occurred in the 20th century, and the globalization of business is causing changes in the world’s economy that we are only beginning to understand. In this course, we will spend several weeks studying how entrepreneurship and innovation are affected by government institutions. We will then spend several weeks studying business strategy in the global business environment, focusing on the role of regulations imposed by foreign governments and international organizations. Class meetings will be a mix of lecture and discussion, use real-world cases, and feature guest speakers. By the end of the course, you will have a stronger understanding of how businesses shape and are shaped by government policies. There are no prerequisites for this course, though some exposure to political science or economics is useful.

Graduate Courses

TEM 411: General Management of New Venture (4 credits) - Jim Zavislan

This course provides an opportunity to examine the management practices associated with technical innovation and new business development. The analysis of entrepreneurship is evaluated primarily from the perspective of a start-up venture that requires equity capital investment. Management issues discussed include organizational development, analysis of market opportunities, market engagement, financial planning and control, capitalization, sources of funds, the due-diligence process and valuing the venture. Teams of three to four students will collaborate in the preparation of a business plan. The course will include time for students to share business ideas and identify possible team members. Each team will have a coach who is an experienced businessperson. The coach will be available to provide feedback to the team.

TEM 441: Product Development & Tech Management (4 credits) - Mark Wilson

The course will introduce the development of products under the FDAs CGMP (current good manufacturing practices) and the ISO 13485 standard for medical devices. The intent is to understand how to use these standards (or the ISO9000 standard for products other than medical devices) to develop products or research systems that meet requirements. The course will emphasize understanding customer and market requirements, which leads to a product requirements document (PRD), and proceeds through concept development, risk and failure analysis, industrial and human factors design considerations, design analysis and manufacturing considerations. The course also presents topics on scheduling, budgeting, patents and intellectual property management. Special note on mobile-app-only development: while app development is popular, the risks and the business models are very unique from a regular hardware-based product development. Therefore, this class will not cover the concepts of app development.

ENT 423: New Venture Development (2.5 credits) - Dennis Kessler

The focus of ENT 423 is learning how to prepare an effective business plan that will communicate the inherent value of the concept. Among the critical issues that will be addressed are: competitive conditions and industry trends, sustainable competitive advantages, management team, marketing plan, financial plan, exit possibilities, franchising, legal entities. The approach used is appropriate for start-ups and for corporate venturing. It is also suitable for both profit and for not-for-profit organizations. Also included is a social entrepreneurship module. At the same time plans are prepared, other entrepreneurial issues are studied, such as assembly resources, launching and building new ventures and harvesting results. Lectures, cases and guest speakers are utilized. The speakers will address a range of new venture topics from the development of management teams, marketing, finance, venture capitalists and legal issues. The completion of a business plan for a proposed new venture is required.

ENT 425: Technical Entrepreneurship (4 credits) - Duncan Moore, Michael Riedlinger

This course provides an opportunity to examine the management practices associated with technical innovation and new business development. The analysis of entrepreneurship is evaluated primarily from the perspective of a start-up venture that requires equity capital investment. Management issues discussed include organizational development, analysis of market opportunities, market engagement, financial planning and control, capitalization, sources of funds, the due-diligence process, and valuing the venture. An important reason for taking this course is to learn how to develop a business plan. Therefore, a significant component of a student’s final grade will be based on this. In too many instances, a new venture does not become a viable entity because either there is no plan, or if there is, it is poorly conceived. Furthermore, a good plan is an effective communications tool for the investment community. An additional benefit is learning to work in multidisciplinary teams. Teams of three to four students collaborate in the preparation of a business plan. The course includes time for students to share business ideas and identify possible team members. In general, each team includes two students and two science/technology graduate students. Other team configurations are possible with instructor approval. Each team’s business plan will receive a grade and that grade will apply to each individual on the team. Each team has a coach who is an experienced businessperson. The coach is available to provide feedback to the team. This course is cross listed at OPT 481 and is taught by a faculty member at Simon and who is from Engineering.

ENT 442C: Practicum in Urban Entrepreneurship (2.5 credits) - Kathleen Washington

With the loss of vital economic drivers, Rochester is a prime example of an urban environment experiencing infrastructure distress and stagnation with a marked decrease of quality of life for its inhabitants. Like any urban environment, promoting a virtuous cycle of economic growth is vital for the recovery of Rochester. Social entrepreneurs play a critical role by engaging business tactics and an understanding of market-efficient forces that deliver savvy and creative solutions to address core urban issues, such as reducing poverty (through job creation and other means), increasing access to capital (community banking and microfinance), promoting business growth (incubators, accelerators and the role of the university), residential and retail development, effectively delivering public health services, education for its populace and future work force (i.e. Khan Academy and charter schools) and ensuring a safe and healthy environment. By encouraging new entity formation and reengineering existing organizations, these challenges create opportunities for the social entrepreneur. Understanding the fundamental pieces of the urban puzzle is essential for an urban social entrepreneur to come up with effective and relevant solutions.

ENT 442X: International Consulting & Entrepreneurship (2.5 credits) - Dennis Kessler, Yoram Katz

This course is designed to provide students with a hands-on experiential learning opportunity for global entrepreneurship through a combination of lectures, a real-life business development project and learning about the Israeli entrepreneurial ecosystem. Students will be partnered with an Israeli startup that is looking to expand their markets served by penetrating the US market. The project will include following a consultative model, analyzing the markets and opportunities and presenting their recommendations to the client. Israel has built a stellar reputation for being one of the most innovative countries in the world and has the highest per capita number of startup companies in the world. Their citizens have a perseverant, takecharge approach to business, which has led a vast number of international conglomerates to base their R&D and New Product Development Centers in Israel. This class will introduce students to the Israeli culture and business climate along with multi-national corporations that have moved mission-critical centers and startup venture activities to Israel. The International Business Practicum will introduce students to Israel’s history, which will help them understand how Israel came to be what it is today.

ENT 444: Entrepreneurial Finance (2.5 credits) - Urs Waelchli

This course provides an introduction to financial theories and tools an entrepreneur needs to start, build, and harvest a successful venture. Lectures and case studies cover financial planning, business valuation (including the venture capital and the real option approach), financing, venture capital funds, compensation structures, and exit strategies.

Eastman School of Music Courses

ALC 210 / ALC 410 / JCM 261: Entrepreneurial Thinking (2 credits) - James Doser

An entrepreneurial person is one who transforms an idea into an enterprise that creates value. Musicians have been entrepreneurial thinkers throughout history, and continue to be so. Entrepreneurial Thinking helps students to recognize the entrepreneurial potential they posses, appreciate the role of entrepreneurship within society and in their own professional lives, and understand and implement the processes and skills of entrepreneurship. Students envision, develop, and present a Capstone Project in this course, titled ‘The Big Idea’. This is a project, initiative, product, business, or other entrepreneurial idea chosen by the student. Essential concepts covered in this class include idea generation, assessing potential value and feasibility, market analysis, writing for business, developing marketing strategies, budgeting, types of business structures, funding, contracts, legal issues, and best practices for effective presentations. This course may also serve as a resource for students wishing to submit applications to the IML Grant and Mentorship Program, Eastman/ArtistShare Program, and Paul R. Judy Grant Program.

ALC 217B / ALC 417B: Copyright & Licensing for Musicians (1 credit) - Stephen Danyew

This 7-week course will provide an in-depth look at the current business of music copyright and licensing. Students will learn about the history of copyright, current laws, and how it’s relevant for performers, composers, and all those working in the music field. Students will also learn about music licensing, how royalties are earned and distributed, and how streaming on the web is changing music licensing. We will consider real-life scenarios and actual case studies from the music business, and guest speakers will share insights and experiences from the field.

ALC 218A / ALC 418A: Funding the Individual Artist (1 credit) - Jacob Langerak

This 7-week course will provide an in-depth look at the current business of music copyright and licensing. Students will learn about the history of copyright, current laws, and how it’s relevant for performers, composers, and all those working in the music field. Students will also learn about music licensing, how royalties are earned and distributed, and how streaming on the web is changing music licensing. We will consider real-life scenarios and actual case studies from the music business, and guest speakers will share insights and experiences from the field.

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Questions?

Contact Catherine Livingston, Program Assistant.