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Global Engagement

Health Insurance, Immunizations & Health Care

Visiting students and visiting scholars each have their own health insurance and immunization requirements.

 

Accessing Health Care in the United States

The United States has a strong and well-known reputation for quality health care services. These services include:

  • Routine and preventative care
  • Urgent care for accidents and emergencies
  • Comprehensive health management for diagnosed conditions

All health care providers must be trained and licensed to practice medicine. While emergency care will be provided to anyone in need without question, health care services in the United States are extremely expensive. It is important to plan ahead for the health needs of yourself and your accompanying family while visiting the University.

To locate a doctor in the area that is covered under your insurance, see your health insurance policy or contact your insurance provider.

 

Emergency Departments

Also referred to as the “ER,” an emergency room is the department of the hospital responsible for immediate treatment for acute illnesses, severe trauma, and accidents. No one is turned away from a visit to the Emergency Department. However, these visits may be extremely expensive and are recommended only in states of emergency.

ER locations near the University include:

Strong Emergency Department
601 Elmwood Avenue
Rochester, NY 14642
+1 (585) 275-4551

Highland Hospital
1000 South Avenue
Rochester, NY 14620
+1 (585) 473-2200

Unity Hospital
1555 Long Pond Road
Rochester, NY 14626
+1 (585) 723-7070

 

Urgent Care

Urgent care is primarily a walk-in clinic focused on the treatment of injuries and illnesses requiring immediate care, but that are not serious enough to require an ER visit.

Urgent care locations near the University include:

Unity Walk-In Care Center
89 Genesee St
Rochester, NY 14611
+1 (585) 368-3531

Xpress Care Medical
1637 Howard Road
Rochester, NY 14624
+1 (585) 429-9777

 

Pharmacies

Often referred to as a “drug store,” a pharmacy is a store where medicinal drugs are dispensed and sold. Prescription drugs are available only with a physician’s prescription. Over-the-counter medications are available without a physician’s prescription.

Other important information about pharmacies in the United States:

  • Many medications and items are available without a prescription in other countries, but are not available without a prescription in the US
  • Foreign prescriptions are generally not accepted at most pharmacies
  • Prescription medications may be covered under your insurance, or you may only pay a small fee or co-pay. Reference your health insurance coverage policy or contact your policy provider.

Pharmacies near the University include:

CVS Pharmacy–Photo
789 Elmwood Ave
Rochester, NY 14620
+1 (585) 271-5031

 

Additional On-Campus Resources

At Rochester, the University’s CARE Network helps identify students in, or heading toward, distress. With timely and appropriate support, the network can ensure students access the services and resources they need to thrive.

The CARE Network is most effective when the University community shares information about its students in distress. You can:

Learn more about the network on the CARE website.

 

Glossary of Health Care Terms

Affordable Care Act
In March 2010, President Obama signed into law the Affordable Care Act (ACA), putting comprehensive health insurance reforms into place. Separate from the immigration status requirement, the ACA is a federal health care law, not an immigration law. At this point it’s unclear which nonimmigrant students and scholars may be subject to the individual mandate, the provision under the ACA which requires individuals who do not maintain a minimum level of health insurance (a level higher than that of the J requirement) to pay a penalty if an annual income tax return is filed. We do not advise on the ACA as it is beyond the scope of our expertise. For more information, view the Treatment of Noncitizens Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PDF).
Comprehensive Coverage
Usually the most expensive type of insurance coverage, a comprehensive plan gives you total freedom of choice regarding the physicians and specialists you see. When looking at these plans, you want to be certain that you are covered for in-patient as well as out-patient costs, and that there is one deductible to be met within a calendar year.
Co-Pay
A fixed payment for a covered service, paid when an individual receives service. In the United States, copayment is a payment defined in an insurance policy and paid by an insured person each time a medical service is accessed.
Deductible
The amount you owe for covered health care services before your health insurance or plan begins to pay. For example, if your deductible is $1,000, your plan won’t pay anything until you’ve met your $1,000 deductible for covered health care services subject to the deductible.
Emergency Department
Also referred to as the “ER” or “emergency room,” this is the department of the hospital responsible for immediate treatment for acute illnesses, severe trauma, and accidents. No one is turned away from a visit to the Emergency Department. However, these visits may be extremely expensive and are recommended only in states of emergency.
HIPAA
The federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996. The primary goal of the law is to make it easier for people to keep health insurance, protect the confidentiality and security of health care information, and help the health care industry control administrative costs.
Health Insurance
A type of insurance coverage that pays for medical and surgical expenses that are incurred by the insured. Health insurance can either reimburse the insured for expenses incurred from illness or injury or pay the care provider directly.
In-Network Co-Payment
A fixed amount you pay for covered health care services to providers who contract with your health insurance or plan. In-network co-payments usually are less than out-of-network co-payments.
Network
The facilities, providers, and suppliers your health insurer or plan has contracted with to provide health care services.
Out-of-Network Co-Payment
A fixed amount you pay for covered health care services from providers who do not contract with your health insurance or plan. Out-of-network co-payments usually are more than in-network co-payments.
Pediatrician
A medical practitioner specializing in children and their diseases. A pediatrician treats children from birth to age 21 and is trained to diagnose a broad range of illnesses.
Pharmacy
Often referred to as a “drug store,” pharmacies are stores where medicinal drugs are dispensed and sold. Note that prescription drugs are available only with a physician’s prescription. Over-the-counter medications are available without a physician’s prescription.
Pre-Existing Condition
A pre-existing condition is any condition for which the patient has already received medical advice or treatment prior to enrollment in a new medical insurance plan.
Premium
The amount that must be paid for your health insurance or plan. You and/or your employer usually pay it monthly, quarterly, or yearly.
Prescription Plan
Many insurance plans offer prescription plans. If this is a good plan, it could be beneficial because you would only pay a small portion of the cost of prescription medication.
Primary Care Doctors
Primary care physicians (PCPs) provides both first contact for a person with an undiagnosed health concern as well as continuing care of varied medical conditions, not limited by problem origin, organ system, or diagnosis.
Specialists
Doctors who have completed advanced education and training in a specific area of medicine (e.g., adolescent medicine specialist, dermatologist, allergist). To find a specialist, contact UHS or your primary care doctor.
Urgent Care
Urgent care is primarily a walk-in clinic focused on the treatment of injuries and illnesses requiring immediate care, but not serious enough to require an ER visit.

 

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