24 October 13 | Chad W. Post |

OK, I’ve been promising this for a long time, but I’ve finally got my stuff together and have information on the five judges for this year’s BTBA in Poetry.

Bios for all five can be found below, and for publishers looking to submit their books, here is a PDF of mailing list label that you can use, and here’s one with everyone’s email addresses if you’d rather submit electronically.

As with the BTBA in Fiction, any book published for the first time ever in translation between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2013, AND available for sale in the United States is eligible. To enter a book in the contest, all you have to do is (e)mail a copy to all of the judges. (And one to me for record-keeping.)

In terms of timeframes, all poetry books should be sent to the judges by January 31st, 2014.

The finalists for this year’s Poetry award will be announced on Tuesday, April 15th at the same time as the Fiction finalists.

OK, now onto this year’s judges:

Stefania Heim is author of the collection of poems, A Table that Goes on for Miles (forthcoming January 2014 Switchback Books). Her poems, translations, and works of criticism have appeared widely, in publications including A Public Space, Aufgabe, Harper’s, Jacket2, The Literary Review, and The Paris Review. She is a founding editor of CIRCUMFERENCE: Poetry in Translation and will soon be joining the Boston Review as a new Poetry Editor.

Bill Martin is a translator, critic, and educator, and co-organizer of The Bridge reading series for literary translation.

Rebecca McKay is a poet and translator based at Florida Atlantic University. Her poems and translations have appeared in American Letters & Commentary, ACM, Third Coast, The Iowa Review, Hotel Amerika, Rhino, Natural Bridge, Rattapallax, and elsewhere.

Daniele Pantano is a Swiss poet, translator, editor, critic, and Reader in Poetry and Literary Translation at Edge Hill University, England. For more information, please visit his website..

Anna Rosenwong is a translator, poet, and higher educator. She holds an MFA from the University of Iowa and a PhD in Comparative Literature from the University of California, Irvine. She is the author of By Way of Explanation (Dancing Girl Press) and the translator of José Eugenio Sánchez’s Suite Prelude a/H1N1 (Toad Press) and Rocío Cerón’s Diorama (Phoneme Press). Her work has appeared in World Literature Today, Translation Studies, Pool, Jacket 2, Anomalous Press, The Kenyon Review, Painted Bride Quarterly, The St. Petersburg Review, Eleven Eleven, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Words Without Borders, and elsewhere.

So start sending in your submissions . . . now!

9 January 13 | Chad W. Post | Comments

This is a long time in coming, but here’s the list of the poetry judges for this year’s Best Translated Book Award:

  • Brandon Holmquest, poet, translator, editor of CALQUE
  • Jennifer Kronovet, poet and translator
  • Erica Mena-Landry, poet and translator
  • Idra Novey, poet, translator
  • Kevin Prufer, poet, academic, essayist, and co-editor of New European Poets

To have a book considered for this year’s award, the first ever translation of this work must have come out between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012. No new translations are eligible. (For example, a new Duino Elegies isn’t eligible because English readers had access to a translation of this in the past. Hopefully this makes sense . . .)

Click here for a PDF with the names and mailing addresses of all the Poetry judges (and me, since it’s good for us to have a copy of everything on hand, just in case).

Finally, the “Due Date” for submissions is JANUARY 31, 2013. Not that far away, but time enough to get these out to everyone.

Also, if you would rather submit books as PDFs, just email me at chad.post [at] rochester.edu and I can send you the email addresses for the poetry judges.

Thanks! And good luck!

....
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