6 March 14 | Chad W. Post | Comments

So, my friend, writer, and fellow critic of this year’s Duke basketball team, Paul Maliszewski, emailed me this morning with a really intriguing story:

Here’s an odd thing I overheard yesterday. I went to the rare reading (rare for me) by John Banville, and a woman in the audience asked this question, which was more of a comment, about how in the 1960s, Ethiopian writers were greatly influenced by Samuel Beckett. Banville knew nothing about this, and the conversation moved on, but I thought I would ask you: have you heard of this? Or read any Ethiopian literature in translation? A brief turn around Google turns up nothing. Just sounded interesting to me, and sounded like something maybe Open Letter would be interested in, too, given the influence.

Yes—Open Letter would be very interested! Does anyone out there know anything about this? If so, please share.

....
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