22 July 11 | Julianna Romanazzi | Comments

In addition to Leif Randt’s Ernst Willner prize, the Festival of German-Language Literature has also announced its Ingeborg Bachmann, Kelag, 3sat, and for the first time ever, Audience Award for its submissions of new German literature.

The Ingeborg Bachmann Prize, one of the most prestigious that the Festival awards, was given this year to Maja Haderlap for her Im Kessel (In the Kettle). The prize, named after famed Austrian writer and playwright Ingeborg Bachmann, was awarded by the provincial capital of Klagenfurt for EUR 25,000.

Also taking home an award was Steffen Popp with the Kelag Prize for his Spur einer Dorfgeschichte (Trace of a Village History). The Kelag Prize was donated by the Kärntner Elektrizitäts und Aktiengesellschaft (a local electric company) and worth a handsome EUR 10,000.

As well as the the Kärntner Elektrizitäts und Aktiengesellschaft, another corporate sponsor also awarded a prize. 3sat, a German-Austrian cultural broadcasting company, gave its 3sat Prize to Nina Buβmann for Große Ferien (Long Holidays) and a cash prize of EUR 7500.

Beginning this year at the Festival’s 36th inception VILLIglas sponsored the a new annual prize, the VILLI Audience Award. The award, donated by VILLIglas owner Phillip Daniel Merckle, was voted on by the public exclusively through the internet and given to Thomas Klupp for his 9to5 Hardcore.

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