6 February 13 | Chad W. Post | Comments

Just found this on Arabic Literature (in English):

The American Literary Translators Association is pleased to announce that applications are now being accepted for the 2013 ALTA Travel Fellowship Awards.1 Each year, four to six fellowships in the amount of $1,000 are awarded to beginning (unpublished or minimally published) translators to help them pay for travel expenses to the annual ALTA conference. This year’s conference will be held October 16–19 in Bloomington, Indiana.

At the conference, ALTA Fellows will give readings of their translated work at a keynote event, thus providing them with an opportunity to present their translations to a large audience of other translators, as well as to publishers and authors from around the world. ALTA Fellows will also have the opportunity to meet experienced translators and to find mentors.

If you would like to apply for a 2013 ALTA Travel Fellowship, please e-mail if possible a cover letter explaining your interest in attending the conference; your CV; and no more than ten double-spaced pages of translated text (prose or poetry) accompanied by the original text to maria.suarez – at- utdallas.edu.

Deadline is May 15, 2013, so you have a bit of time, but you might still want to get on it.

1 I’m leaving this double-spaces in this first paragraph just to show that that’s how ALTA wrote it. And tell all of you that double-spaces after periods is just plain WRONG. Paragraphs 2 and 3 are correctly spaced. You’re welcome.

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