12 December 12 | Chad W. Post | Comments

As the year comes to a close, we thought we’d take a minute to look back at what we’ve done over the past twelve months. It’s also that time of year when we thank you for your continued support, and ask for your help in the year to come by participating in our Annual Campaign.

You probably already know that Three Percent and Open Letter are nonprofits housed at the University of Rochester, and, as such, our annual revenue comes from a few diverse sources, including book sales, foundational support, and governmental support (from here and abroad). Our most important source of funding, however, comes from individuals, like you, interested in furthering the appreciation of international literature.

Thanks to the support of our readers and fans, we’ve accomplished more over the past year than ever before:

• We published 10 critically-acclaimed titles from around the world, including two that made Kirkus’s Best Fiction of 2012 list;

• We were awarded our first NEA Publishing Art Works grant for an amazing $45,000, one of the largest prizes awarded to any literary organization in the U.S.;

• The Reading the World Conversation Series entered its fifth season;

• Awarded the fifth annual Best Translated Book Awards;

• Continued to expand Three Percent, celebrating literature in translation;

• Offered internships and fellowships to students from around the world interested in getting into the publishing field.

So, with our achievements higher and our momentum stronger than ever before, your continued interest has never been more vital, or more appreciated. Our goal is to foster a healthy book culture—something that wouldn’t be possible without you.

To that end, please consider supporting Three Percent and Open Letter. Your tax-deductible contribution to our Annual Campaign — online or via mail with this donation form — will ensure that this important undertaking continues to flourish, expand, and engage with more readers than ever before.

Sincerely,

Chad W. Post
Publisher

Nathan Furl
Art & Operations

Kaija Straumanis
Editorial

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The History of Silence
The History of Silence by Pedro Zarraluki
Reviewed by P. T. Smith

Pedro Zarraluki’s The History of Silence (trans. Nick Caistor and Lorenza García) begins with the narrator and his wife, Irene, setting out to write a book about silence, itself called The History of Silence: “This is the story of how. . .

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Flesh-Coloured Dominoes
Flesh-Coloured Dominoes by Zigmunds Skujiņš
Reviewed by P. T. Smith

There are plenty of reasons you can fail to find the rhythm of a book. Sometimes it’s a matter of discarding initial assumptions or impressions, sometimes of resetting oneself. Zigmunds Skujiņš’s Flesh-Coloured Dominoes was a defining experience in the necessity. . .

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Iraqi Nights
Iraqi Nights by Dunya Mikhail
Reviewed by Vincent Francone

In a culture that privileges prose, reviewing poetry is fairly pointless. And I’ve long since stopped caring about what the world reads and dropped the crusade to get Americans to read more poems. Part of the fault, as I’ve suggested. . .

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Three-Light Years
Three-Light Years by Andrea Canobbio
Reviewed by Tiffany Nichols

I would like to pose the argument that it is rare for one to ever come across a truly passive protagonist in a novel. The protagonist (perhaps) of Three Light-Years, Claudio Viberti, is just that—a shy internist who lives in. . .

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The Little Horse
The Little Horse by Thorvald Steen
Reviewed by P. T. Smith

The last five days of the eleventh-century Icelandic politician, writer of sagas, and famous murder victim Snorri Sturleleson (the Norwegian spelling, Snorre, is preserved in the book) make up Thorvald Steen’s most recently translated historical fiction, The Little Horse. Murdered. . .

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Guys Like Me
Guys Like Me by Dominique Fabre
Reviewed by Peter Biello

We all know Paris, or at least we think we know it. The Eiffel Tower. The Latin Quarter. The Champs-Élysées. The touristy stuff. In Dominique Fabre’s novel, Guys Like Me, we’re shown a different side of Paris: a gray, decaying. . .

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Birth of a Bridge
Birth of a Bridge by Maylis de Kerangal
Reviewed by Christopher Iacono

One hundred pages into Birth of a Bridge, the prize-winning novel from French writer Maylis de Kerangal, the narrator describes how starting in November, birds come to nest in the wetlands of the fictional city of Coca, California, for three. . .

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